Online catalogue

Search our collections

Search the entire Ship Plan and Survey Report collection and the Centre's Library catalogue.
  • All

    Select a category

    Choose which section of the archive you would like to search. In your search you can select 'Everywhere', or narrow down your query by using the drop down filter.

  • Ships, Plans and Survey Reports

    Select a category

    Choose which section of the archive you would like to search. In your search you can select 'Everywhere', or narrow down your query by using the drop down filter.

  • Library

    Select a category

    Choose which section of the archive you would like to search. In your search you can select 'Everywhere', or narrow down your query by using the drop down filter.

79 results Most recent
  • Experiences in operation and maintenance of diesel engines - Indian Navy

    Authors

    Balan Paramesh

    Date published

    2004

    Abstract

    The Indian Navy has been successfully operating diesel engines for the past 50 years. It inherited the remnants of the Royal Navy and today is a force to be reckoned with. Nowadays the Navy's diesel-propelled ships include frigates patrol vessels submarines missiles corvettes survey ships fleet tankers cadet training ship landing ship tanks ocean going tug minesweepers

    Authors

    Balan Paramesh

    Date published

    2004

  • Condition based maintenance in the Royal Navy

    Authors

    W N Watson

    Shelf Location

    213a

    Abstract

    Consideration is given to the history of maintenance management in the Royal Navy and the problems which led to a condition based or predictive maintenance system. Development work continues on new techniques for the condition monitoring and engine health monitoring of key equipment and progress on these matters is discussed. Finally attention is paid to the cost effectiveness of condition monitoring in the RN and areas of possible saving are identified.

    Authors

    W N Watson

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

    Shelf Location

    213a

    Date published

    1989

  • End-to-end maintenance in the Royal Navy - enabling an affordable safe and available fleet

    Authors

    Dave Markland ; Neil Webber ; Mark Rogers

    Date published

    2010

    Abstract

    Like many government departments the MoD (Ministry of Defence) is under ever-increasing pressure to reduce costs whilst maintaining or improving its outputs. A number of initiatives have been put in place to improve operational availability whilst also reducing costs. One key methodology introduced more than 10 years ago to reduce through-life maintenance costs was RCM (reliability-centred maintenance). However this change to maintenance regime was not without difficulty and consequently a number of problems arose. The MMSG (maritime maintenance support group) was formed in early 2008 to group together a number of different teams involved in the maintenance administration and delivery process whose work had until that point been done in isolation and in an incoherent way. This paper examines the problems that were identified the programme of work that has commenced to reduce maintenance costs sharpen its governance and administration and improve the operational availability of the platforms. All this has to be done whilst providing value for money and without compromising safety.

    Authors

    Dave Markland ; Neil Webber ; Mark Rogers

    Date published

    2010

  • Ship systems technical symposium Asne Delaware Valley Section Naval Ship Systems Engineering Station and Philadelpia Naval Shipyard

    Authors

    Asne Delaware Valley Section

    Shelf Location

    214d

    Abstract

    Symp held Oct 2 - 3 1980 in Philadelphia Papers are Ship installation equipment modernisation for the aircraft carier service life extension programme Maintenance of aircraft carriers - a challenge - current and future The DD 963 class maintenance plan - a major element in an integrated life cycle maintenance strategy A practical approach to control of shipboard electromagnetic interference Fast food joins the navy Shipboard machinery control - The next generation maintenance painting in the U S Navy Underwater hull maintenance Reliability of shipboard elevators - is there hope for improvement? Navy standard underway replenishment machinery Ship design performance through innovation Mechanical fluid support systems Gas turbine ship engineering control systems The development of a total intergrated logistics support effort Maintenance planning technology - A new look A new approach to operating cycle maintenance (destroyer engineered operating cycle program) Ship land-based test sites - lessons learned The shipyards role in light-off examinations Digital electronic monitoring and control of naval shipyard turbine driven auxiliary equipment

    Authors

    Asne Delaware Valley Section

    Publisher

    SSTS

    Shelf Location

    214d

    Date published

    1980

  • The US Navy-ABS service life assessment program

    Authors

    Thomas J Eccles ; Richard Delpizzo ; Sam Albrecht et al.

    Date published

    2010

    Abstract

    One of the most challenging aspects of fleet husbandry today for any government ship owner is the proper assessment of where to spend maintenance resources to keep ships mission-ready and safe for the personnel who sail them as well as for the operating environment. The aim is to determine areas where ABS can assist the Navy and share common knowledge and processes in identifying where maintenance action is most needed on ships and recommend focused inspections whereby the continuing health of these systems may be tracked. This paper describes the components that make up the Service Life Assessment Programme and the potential benefits from application of ABS in-service classification practices applied to selected naval ship classes in the context of current Navy methods processes and procedures for inspection and maintenance.

    Authors

    Thomas J Eccles ; Richard Delpizzo ; Sam Albrecht et al.

    Date published

    2010

  • A structural approach for in-service support in the Royal Netherlands Navy - a comparison of merchant and naval methods

    Authors

    W J Pesman ; J Klein-Woud

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

    Abstract

    A structured and systematic method for the design of a maintenance programme during the design engineering and exploitation phases of a ship's life is described. The MACAD method developed by Delft University and Nedlloyd Lines consists of failure mode analysis a quantified operational and safety risk analysis and maintenance concept design which involves cost optimisation. The described method of in-service support (ISS) at the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN) places the definition of the maintenance concept in a total system of exploitation of the ships and leads to reduced life cycle costs. Comparison of naval and merchant application showed that it is much more difficult to express operational use and significance on naval ships in terms of money. This prevented the possibility of performing real cost optimisations with regard to maintenance task intervals.

    Authors

    W J Pesman ; J Klein-Woud

    Date published

    1996

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

  • Affordable support - the alliance approach to optimising through life maintenance management of Royal Navy complex surface warships

    Authors

    Steven J McCarthy

    Date published

    2010

    Abstract

    Provision of support to warships is a specialist activity and the combination of complexity and market forces make derivation of a sustainable affordable support model particularly challenging. Faced with the challenge of sustaining an ageing fleet coupled with reducing budgets and a diminishing industrial base the UK MoD (Ministry of Defence) and Government acknowledge that the traditional Royal Navy Support model was no longer sustainable. Consequently the MoD commissioned the SSS (surface ship support) programme as a component of the over-arching UK Maritime Change Programme to examine the options to deliver sustainable effective and affordable support to complex warships. This paper will describe the UK MoD's future support model which aims to deliver high quality cost-effective support to ships of the Royal Navy with the expectation that it will deliver the environment for affordable support to the future fleet.

    Authors

    Steven J McCarthy

    Date published

    2010

  • Seeing is believing; how the endoscope helps machinery maintenance

    Authors

    S H Lock

    Date published

    1985

    Abstract

    Experience gained by the Royal Navy in using a fibre optic endoscope to inspect the interior of Rolls Royce Tyne gas turbine engines is discussed. The techniques are equally applicable to other engines including the Olympus also used by the Royal Navy.

    Authors

    S H Lock

    Date published

    1985

  • Future Ship concerts for Repair and Maintenance at Sea

    Authors

    Andy Kimber

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    The repair and maintenance of naval vessels deployed away from their primary support infrastructure is an often overlooked area with existing repair and maintenance ships either being of old design or vessels converted from commercial ships. Increasingly the nature of the Royal Navy and other navy operations will see an emphasis on deployments away from home waters for extended periods as global presence is demanded from a decreasing pool of warships. Hence the maintenance and repair of deployed naval vessels will become a significant issue. Additionally future changes in the operating nature of the fleet with an increased focus in support of expeditionary warfare and humanitarian relief operations will require more utilitarian vessels. The impact of these evolving operations on potential concepts for future maintenance vessels has been explored and notional requirements developed. thse have been considered against a variety of vessel options and an innovative heavy lift ship solution has been developed as one potential concept for an expeditionary repair and maintenance platform. This paper explores some of the potential future requirements for the next generation of repair and maintenance vessels within a historical context of current and past vessels. Two case studies are presented and discussed for a cable ship conversion and an innovative heavy lift concept as potential solutions.

    Authors

    Andy Kimber

    Date published

    2006

  • Diesel engines

    Authors

    The Naval Education and Training Support Command

    Shelf Location

    208d

    Abstract

    The text is written to aid junior officers and petty officers of the US Navy and Naval Reserve in gaining an understanding of the diesel engines in use by the Navy as auxiliary and propulsion units. It is intended to serve as a reference for personnel actually working on, or supervising work on, diesel engines. For the benefit of personnel who have gained practical experience in diesel engine operation and maintenance, this text offers a general coverage of the theory, design and thermodynamics of diesel engines. For those who have gained an academic grounding in diesel engineering, the text describes specific design, maintenance, and operating procedures related to the most commonly used diesel engines. Chapters include chapters on: reciprocating internal-combustion engines, Fuel systems and engine control, Air intake and exhaust systems, Lubricating oil systems, Cooling, Starting systems, Transmission of engine power and Diesel operating procedures. The final chapter is a troubleshooting section, for trouble starting a diesel engine and ones that are encountered after an engine has started.

    Authors

    The Naval Education and Training Support Command

    Publisher

    The Naval Education and Training Support Command (NAVEDTRA 10625)

    Shelf Location

    208d

    Date published

    1976

  • Status report on proposed changes to permissible airborne emission exposure limits for US shipyard workers

    Authors

    Harvey R Castner

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    Some of the operations carried out in Navy facilities and in public and private shipyards during construction maintenance and repair of ships generate airborne emissions that are potential health hazards to workers. The OSHA (occupational safety and health administration) of the US Department of Labour and ACGIH (the American conference of governmental industrial hygienists) are making or considering reductions in worker exposure limits for nickel manganese and chromium compounds including hexavalent chromium. These changes will impact on the operations and processes used by Navy facilities and public and private shipyards for construction maintenance and repair of ships. A Navy-Industry Task Group lead by the Naval Sea Systems Command is addressing these concerns and has gathered data on current worker exposure levels to nickel (Ni) manganese (Mn) total cromium (Cr) and hexavalent chromium (Cr(Vi)). The data gathered to date from literature from the Navy Environmental Health database from shipyard worker sampling and from controlled laboratory welding tests is reported.

    Authors

    Harvey R Castner

    Date published

    2006

  • Hydraulic system cleanliness- design manufacture operation and maintenance aspects

    Authors

    D L Kitch

    Date published

    1974

    Abstract

    Particulate contamination in hydraulic systems is discussed. Contamination classes adopted by the Royal Navy (RN) are described and short and long- term effects of particulate contamination are summarised. At the design stage a cost effective analysis should be undertaken to decide the Optimum Contamination Level for the system. The cleaning of the system sampling valves filters and other contamination separation devices are considered at this stage. Contamination control during manufacture is briefly mentioned. Environmental and quality control of hydraulic systems during installation is dealt with. Recommendations for operating and maintenance instructions during service are given. Contamination control equipment in use by the Ministry of Defence (Navy) (MOD (N)) is discussed. A Pipe Cleaning Standard has been issued and cleaning facilities have been set up in Royal Dock yards. System flushing rigs are described. MOD(N) has drawn up a code of practice for flushing operations. A range of portable flushing units is required. Procedures for assessment of contamination and fluid sampling equipment in use by RN are described. The Comparison Slide Microscope is shown. Particle counting equipment is mentioned.

    Authors

    D L Kitch

    Date published

    1974

  • A hybrid approach to warship structural maintenance management

    Authors

    A Dinovitzer ; R Basu ; K Holt

    Date published

    1997

    Abstract

    Traditional methods of managing warship maintenance are outlined and compared with the concepts principles and practices of modern ship structural maintenance management systems particularly RAMS (Reliability Availability Maintainability and Supportability) RCM (Reliability Centered Maintenance) and RM (Risk Management). The Ship Structural Integrity Program (SSIP) developed for the specific needs of the Canadian Navy and incorporating features of RAMS RCM and RM is described with details of the methodology and its implementation.

    Authors

    A Dinovitzer ; R Basu ; K Holt

    Date published

    1997

  • Managing naval maintenance - the new challenge

    Authors

    P M Kohler

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

    Abstract

    The cost of maintaining the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) can be reduced while still meeting operational requirements. The RAN now ensures that vessel maintenance is now directly linked to operational need. Trials with HMAS Tobruk validate the new policy and show that maintenance costs can be reduced by 15% while sustaining current Chief of Defence Force Readiness Requirements. This paper reviews the RAN's maintenance development and implementation project which uses a systems analysis approach to determining maintenance requirements.

    Authors

    P M Kohler

    Date published

    1992

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

  • The implications of a Royal Naval reliability-centered maintenance programme

    Authors

    G F Steven

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

    Abstract

    Main features of Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology are described together with its proposed adaptation by the Royal Navy in order to carry out a review of ship and submarine maintenance practices and provide a base for their future development: Typical RCM outputs are outlined and expected benefits (re through-life costs audit trail training) discussed.

    Authors

    G F Steven

    Date published

    1994

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

  • Managing RAN maintenance cost effectively

    Authors

    P M Kholer ; F A Marshall

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

    Abstract

    An extensive review of maintenance philosophy and practices in the Royal Australian Navy has been carried out by BHP Information Technology and the RAN Maintenance Management Working Group and has resulted in an new system based on the principles of "Capability Delivery Approach" (CDA) and "Cost Optimising Maintenance". Exploratory work on the system has been carried out on the HMAS Tobruk and is briefly discussed. Future promotion and revision will be carried out by the Maintenance Development and Implementation Project (MDIP).

    Authors

    P M Kholer ; F A Marshall

    Date published

    1994

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

  • Fresh water distiller for easy maintenance

    Authors

    MER

    Date published

    1984

    Abstract

    The JWP-26C compact fresh water distiller from Alfa-Laval Nirex Engineering has been developed from the larger JWP-36C design with the emphasis on easy maintenance minimum spares and quick installation. The unit features a combined condenser cooling and ejector water system stainless steeel construction and titanium plates. The company's involvements with other methods of desalination (reverse osmosis ion exchange and electro-dialysis) are mentioned.

    Authors

    MER

    Date published

    1984

  • Training a Navy - the Extensive Use of Simulators

    Authors

    R C F Hill

    Date published

    1991

    Abstract

    This paper illustrates the way in which the Royal Navy makes extensive use of simulators to ensure the safe and competent operation of the densely packed modern machinery and weapon systems found onboard today's warships. `Simulators' are used to describe a whole range of training environments and devices not just those which are computer- controlled. Simulated areas of training include ship administration damage control firefighting and maintenance. Comprehensive appendices to this paper list RN training establishments and simulators currently in use.

    Authors

    R C F Hill

    Date published

    1991

  • Future surface warships: what Lloyd's Register can do for you! Supporting tomorrow's navy today

    Authors

    R Cooper

    Publisher

    RINA Conference Proceedings

    Abstract

    Lloyd's Register of Shipping can provide in-depth expertise to complement a Naval Authority during the design build and maintenance

    Authors

    R Cooper

    Date published

    2001

    Publisher

    RINA Conference Proceedings

  • The development of permeable membrane air dehydrators for the US Navy

    Authors

    Thomas Theis ; Stephen E Titus

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    The refrigeration and desiccant dehydrators used to dry low-pressure compressed air aboard Navy ships have been a source of low reliability and high maintenance for years. As part of a program to eliminate chronic shipboard low-pressure air dehydrator problems a Navy-industry team (the Navy Newport News Shipbuilding and a permeable membrane manufacturer) has developed a new generation of permeable membrane air dehydration equipment to replace the complex and unreliable desiccant units currently used. Permeable membrane dehydration is a new technology using new polysulfone semi-permeable polymeric membranes specially designed to carry out molecular separation of gaseous mixtures. This process has proved to be extremely reliable and cost-effective. The successful development of the permeable membrane dehydrator from an SBIR concept to shipboard units is described. A review of the current dehydrators and system history that drove this program and the benefits and pay-offs of the new equipment are presented. Results of the new laboratory evaluation shipboard evaluation and the fleet transition plan are addressed.

    Authors

    Thomas Theis ; Stephen E Titus

    Date published

    2006