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79 results Most recent
  • The development of permeable membrane air dehydrators for the US Navy

    Authors

    Thomas Theis ; Stephen E Titus

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    The refrigeration and desiccant dehydrators used to dry low-pressure compressed air aboard Navy ships have been a source of low reliability and high maintenance for years. As part of a program to eliminate chronic shipboard low-pressure air dehydrator problems a Navy-industry team (the Navy Newport News Shipbuilding and a permeable membrane manufacturer) has developed a new generation of permeable membrane air dehydration equipment to replace the complex and unreliable desiccant units currently used. Permeable membrane dehydration is a new technology using new polysulfone semi-permeable polymeric membranes specially designed to carry out molecular separation of gaseous mixtures. This process has proved to be extremely reliable and cost-effective. The successful development of the permeable membrane dehydrator from an SBIR concept to shipboard units is described. A review of the current dehydrators and system history that drove this program and the benefits and pay-offs of the new equipment are presented. Results of the new laboratory evaluation shipboard evaluation and the fleet transition plan are addressed.

    Authors

    Thomas Theis ; Stephen E Titus

    Date published

    2006

  • Main propulsion gas turbines in the Royal Navy

    Authors

    P D Tatton-Brown

    Date published

    1970

    Abstract

    Naval propulsion requirements and the development of a standard gas turbine marine propulsion machinery package (based on marinised aircraft engines) for use in Royal Navy destroyers and frigates are discussed. Mention is made of design testing and trials with the Rolls Royce Olympus (TMIA) and Tyne (RMIA) gas turbines; the Olympus/Tyne main propulsion machinery package; the module concept of turbine enclosure and installation; maintenance evaluation and design modifications.

    Authors

    P D Tatton-Brown

    Date published

    1970

  • Refitting warships of the Royal Navy of Oman

    Authors

    D J Critchley

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

    Abstract

    Development details of the modern Royal Navy of Oman (RNO) which evolved in the 1970's as a collection of armed dhows and other small craft. As the RNO must patrol large coastlines and the Straits of Hormuz a new purpose built naval base has been proposed to maintain the growing fleet. This paper examines the function of this new base; the upkeep philosophy maintenance defect repair of vessels; individual equipment overhaul; and personnel concerns.

    Authors

    D J Critchley

    Date published

    1992

    Publisher

    IMarE Conferences and Symposia

  • Standardisation of on board marine auxiliaries for a cost effective navy

    Authors

    M K Banger

    Publisher

    Institute of Marine Engineers (India)

    Abstract

    The potential advantages of standardising marine auxiliary machinery and consumables for vessels of the Indian Navy are discussed and include: reduced capital operational and maintenance costs; rationalisation of stores; and improved availability and reliability of ships. Brief details are given for items suitable for standardisation including: portable pumps; motor boats; air compressors; fire pumps; electricity generators; distillation plant; boilers; refrigeration compressors; lubricating oil centrifuges; oil filters; domestic equipment; life saving equipment; and logistics (fuels lubricants refrigerants furniture).

    Authors

    M K Banger

    Date published

    1994

    Publisher

    Institute of Marine Engineers (India)

  • Engineering and the Royal Navy

    Authors

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)

    Shelf Location

    213a

    Abstract

    Conf held 13-14 October 1964 at The Royal Naval Engineering College, 'HMS Thunderer', Manadon, Plymouth. Papers are - The sources and procurement procedures for naval equipment. Seacat. Her Majesty's dockyards. The education and training of naval engineer officers. Some thoughts on strategy and its effect on the design and maintenance of propulsion machinery.

    Authors

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)

    Publisher

    London ; Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)

    Shelf Location

    213a

    Date published

    1964

  • Condition-based maintenance life cycle management and AUTOLOG

    Authors

    Edward Hilferty

    Date published

    2002

    Abstract

    CBM (condition-based maintenance) was instituted by the US Navy in 1998 the goal being to move from time-directed preventive maintenance to condition-directed maintenance. The use of sensors algorithms and automated reasoning and decision-making models to monitor equipment operations provide critical analyses to operators that will help prevent impending failure. CBM technology should detect and classify impending failures; predict the remaining life cycle of equipment interface with the control system to take action; provide support in performing corrective maintenance; provide data to life cycle management activities and update logistics support systems. It is anticipated that this should result in significant improvements in safety reliability and affordability. AUTOLOG is offered as an application and process to gather more real time data needed for CBM from one source that can be quickly and easily provided to distant engineering support activities for gas turbines systems while also easing record keeping and data transmittal requirements for the fleet.

    Authors

    Edward Hilferty

    Date published

    2002

  • Management of shipboard-used hazardous material

    Authors

    Joseph C Dobes

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    US Navy ships generate used HM (hazardous material) during the operation and maintenance of machinery and equipment and the cleaning and preservation of ship spaces. In order to protect the environment and prevent the unnecessary release of harmful products to the world's oceans the Navy established a policy that requires most used HM to be retained on board (with a few exceptions) until it can be turned over to a shore activity for processing. The shore activity is responsible for determining whether the material may be reused as is processed and then reused or has no further use and must be disposed of as an HW (hazardous waste). Several problems result from the Navy's used HM policy. These issues are addressed and solutions are discussed. These solutions will enable the Navy to reduce the amount of used HM generated by its ships effectively removing the material from the ship to a supporting Navy shore activity streamline and standardise the ship-to-shore transfer process and train shipboard personnel involved in the offload of used HM.

    Authors

    Joseph C Dobes

    Date published

    2006

  • Naval Platform Technology Seminar 2005 (10th) - 'Transformational Technologies for the Future Navy' - 17-18 May 2005

    Authors

    Republic of Singapore Navy

    Shelf Location

    213b

    Abstract

    Naval Platform Technology Seminar 2005 - 'Transformational Technologies for the Future Navy' - 17-18 May 2005 Two-day seminar. Papers from day one as follows: Sea Fighter - A revolutionary new platform for the US Navy. This paper describes the design and development of the X-Craft hull form and discusses the innovative technologies used on board it. Also, Optimised manning technologies for naval surface ships, Network centric training technology, new approach in mine warfare and Fully non-linear wave simulator. Day two comprises papers under heading 'Future platforms and optimisation technology': the Gowind corvettes, submarine platform, all electric ship: economics versus technology, simulation technologies for semi and fully automated forces, Submarines in the new world order and Antiterrorist MCM. Also, under heading ; 'Advanced propulsion and computational technology', papers: R & D of a resonating silencer for generator exhausts, Development of simulation and reliability database for marine hazard, risk and maintenance management, The benefits of coating propellers, Comparison of CFD simulation of exhaust smoke-superstructure interaction on a ship, Application for improved research technology and techniques and Stealth and signature management in submarine projects.

    Authors

    Republic of Singapore Navy

    Publisher

    Naval Logistics Department Republic of Singapore Navy

    Shelf Location

    213b

    Date published

    2005

  • Simulating machinery operation

    Authors

    MER

    Date published

    1981

    Abstract

    The increasing use of simulators for naval and merchant marine crew training and experience is discussed. Examples of equipment in use for procedure training maintenance training total environment (heat noise etc) simulation simulation of specific plant (Boiler turbines engines etc) and experience of malfunction are described.

    Authors

    MER

    Date published

    1981

  • Training for fault diagnosis

    Authors

    J B Langham-Brown

    Date published

    1971

    Abstract

    The Functionally Identified Maintenance System developed by the Royal Navy and taught at HMS Collingwood is described in detail. Fault diagnosis is approached with specially prepared proceedings and documentation and similarity between FIMS and the use of algorithms is discussed.

    Authors

    J B Langham-Brown

    Date published

    1971

  • State-of-the-art procedures for ensuring optimum coating longevity in navy tank coating operations

    Authors

    Gordon G Kuljian ; Alexis Kaznoff ; A Richard Parks

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    Annual corrosion control costs have led the Navy maintenance community to institutionalise state-of-the-art surface preparation coating and inspection procedures for seawater ballast potable water and other critical internal tank and void areas. These areas are very expensive to maintain in a corrosion-free condition and often succumb to varying degrees of structural damage. This new direction will double or triple the current service life of the tank corrosion control systems. Here the implementation of such state-of-the-art processes and materials to various surface ship tank-coating operations is commented upon.

    Authors

    Gordon G Kuljian ; Alexis Kaznoff ; A Richard Parks

    Date published

    2006

  • Naval Boilers. Second revised edition

    Authors

    R F Latham

    Shelf Location

    208f

    Abstract

    The book covers the fundamentals of boiler development, design, construction and operation associated with post- World War II vessels of the United States Navy. The first two chapters provide a background to steam generation and ship propulsion. Chapter 3 is a fundamental study of naval boiler design and construction. The last four chapters deal with basic operating equipment and techniques (boiler types: furnace boilers, superheat, circulation boilers, nuclear power ship propulsion) and boiler water treatment, supplying heat to the boiler and principles of boiler operation and maintenance.

    Authors

    R F Latham

    Publisher

    Annapolis, Maryland ; United States Naval Institute

    Shelf Location

    208f

    Date published

    1956

  • Managing and sustaining six aging orphans in the missile age Navy

    Authors

    Ramon Rees

    Date published

    2004

    Abstract

    An attempt is made to explain how ships under the Australian White Ensign are operated and maintained. In this case 6 ships are looked at the youngest of these being fifteen years old and the oldest being nearly thirty. After some introductory information a look is taken at the history - past present and future. Next each of the 6 ships - one off types of ships (orphans) under the control of the Amphibious and Afloat Support System Program Office or AASSPO - are listed with brief information. This is followed by consideration of some differences between merchant and naval practices. Lastly the challenge of the AASSPO to manage the process of maintenance and sustainment of this aging group of ships is looked at.

    Authors

    Ramon Rees

    Date published

    2004

  • Update on solution to RN gas turbine sea water lubricating oil cooler failures when caused by Sulphate Reducing Bacteria ('SRB')

    Authors

    Richard Bolwell

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    A managed programme to review engine failures and take necessary preventive measures has been in place successfully in the Royal Navy since the introduction of gas turbines into service in the 1970's. One of the more prominent failure mechanisms with the Tyne RM1C and Spey SM1A engines has been the degradation of main line bearings accounting for 25 percent of all engines rejected. Historically since the first recorded incident in March 1987 the failures pointed to poor performance of the bearings themselves. However maintenance studies and recent analysis indicates that a vast proportion have occured through previously unidentified chloride corrosion as a result of contamination of the lubricating oil system with salt water from the seawater lubricating oil cooler (SWLO cooler). Despite joint ownership of both engine variants with the Royal Netherlands Navy there was no clear evidence until about six years ago to suggest why the tube perforation was occuring. Indeed the fact that failures have only occured in Royal Navy service is an interesting twist to the problem.

    Authors

    Richard Bolwell

    Date published

    2006

  • Standard Seamanship for the merchant service 2nd edition

    Authors

    Felix Riesenberg

    Shelf Location

    227d

    Abstract

    This book on seamanship includes chapters on types of vessel; the hull; ropes, knots and splices; blocks and tackles; rigging and cargo gear; deck machinery; holds, teaks and tanks; stowage; carriage of live stock; tanker; passenger vessel; boats; piloting; the bridge; rules of the road of the sea; ground tackle; shiphandling; weather; safety and ship maintenance.

    Authors

    Felix Riesenberg

    Publisher

    Chapman & Hall Ltd

    Shelf Location

    227d

    Date published

    1937

  • Pollution prevention COTS equipment: lessons learned and return on investment

    Authors

    Rita L Schuh

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    Pollution prevention is a key element in meeting the challenges of the Navy's Fleet in the new millennium. The P2 (pollution prevention) Afloat program was established in 1995 to develop pollution prevention strategies for the US Navy Fleet. Its goal is source reduction of HM (hazardous materials) used in standard shipboard maintenance and other afloat activities. Executive Order 12856 requires federal facilities to reduce the release of hazardous substances by 50 per cent by 1999 compared to a 1994 baseline. Studies show that up to 70 per cent of the hazardous waste processed at Navy facilities is obtained from HM offloads from ships. The P2 Afloat Team is achieving source reduction goals by identifying assessing and implementing source reduction opportunities aboard ships and focusing on the direct use or minimal re-engineering of COTS (commercial off-the-shelf) products. There have been many challenges and lessons learned during research procurement test and evaluation installation and return on investment analyses of P2 Afloat equipment. Applying these lessons learned regarding pollution prevention in the maritime environment is essential in order to meet the challenges of the Fleet in the new millennium.

    Authors

    Rita L Schuh

    Date published

    2006

  • Education and training for seafarers - what policy for the 1990s

    Authors

    IMarE

    Publisher

    IMarE

    Abstract

    Conf held in London Feb 9 - 10 1984 Papers are an overview of future requirements for manpower planning and training for the UK fleet Experiences and thoughts for the future by a mixed fleet operator Moves towards a single point entry - five years experience Trends in organisational development onboard and the implications for British institutions The modern technology and its impact on marine training in the merchant navy The Royal Navy - manpower training and education now and in the 1990s What is required of a ships officer in a diverse and changing world Changing marine training to accommodate different manning practices British shipping in the nineties - options and consequences Education for an uncertain future Assessing the international and other pressures for change in the role and training of marine engineers Onboard electronic maintenance - the training to fit the need Education and training for the future

    Authors

    IMarE

    Date published

    1984

    Publisher

    IMarE

  • First ever classification of a naval submarine

    Authors

    Lars Grunitz ; Lorenz Petersen

    Date published

    2007

    Abstract

    Navies around the world are increasingly aware of the need to prove to the public and politicians that their submarines are safe - for their crews and the environment. The trouble is that only the world's biggest navies have the personnel and know-how to test the safety of their submarines in service or any new buildings and check the quality of maintenance work. The solution is to put the quality assurance process in the hands of a classification society. That is precisely what the South African Navy did with GL (Germanischer Lloyd). GL have been involved with submarines for many years and with the naval sector for some 30years. GL (Germanischer Lloyd) is now proud to announce that they have certified the world's first naval submarine with a Certificate of Class. The classification of a submarine involves an independent review of the design and the safety during the construction and in-service phase which releases the navy from the pressure to prove to the public that their submarines are safe for the crew and the environment. Here the benefits of classing a naval submarine are highlighted and the experience made with classing the first naval submarines is reported.

    Authors

    Lars Grunitz ; Lorenz Petersen

    Date published

    2007

  • Marine gyro-compasses and automatic pilots. Volume 2: Automatic pilots

    Authors

    W Burger ; A G Corbet

    Shelf Location

    227d

    Abstract

    This book is intended as a reference book for Merchant Navy Officers, but sections of it are also useful for Officers who are studying for their MOT examinations and it is for the latter that some revision questions are included at the end of volume 1. The book consists of two volumes. The first volume deals with Marine Gyro-compasses, the second volume with Automatic Pilots and ancillary equipment as found on most British Merchant Ships. Contents volume 1: Preface; Introduction; Automatic two-unit gyropilot (Sperry); Gyro-Hydraulic Steering control (Sperry); The tiller pilot (Sperry); Gyro-electric steering control (Sperry); Brown automatic steering: review of types, operating instructions, the adjustments, maintenance, fault finding; Automatic pilot for smaller ships; The Arkas automatic pilot: general arrangements, the controls, working principles, pre-sailing checks, operating instructions, maintenance; Ancillary equipment; Brown GMS automatic steering control system; Automatic steering.

    Authors

    W Burger ; A G Corbet

    Publisher

    Pergamon Press

    Shelf Location

    227d

    Date published

    1964

  • Drydock water pollution control efforts at Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    Authors

    Philip M Host

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    Evolving water quality standards and NPDES (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) discharge permit limits demand improved control of water pollutants associated with maintenance of US Navy ships in drydock. During 1992-93 NNSY (Norfolk Naval Shipyard) experienced significant problems in meeting NPDES limits for its drydock discharges ultimately resulting in the issuance of a consent special order by the state of Virginia demanding action to achieve compliance. The problem and the need for standards are described. An extensive effort by NNSY is described to analyse the processes and materials present in drydocks to identify the key potential pollutant sources and to develop the standards procedures process controls and support resources necessary to gain an acceptable level of control over these pollutants. Treatment results are presented. It is hoped that Navy activities and commercial shipbuilders faced with drydock water pollution problems may benefit from a review of NNSY's experience.

    Authors

    Philip M Host

    Date published

    2006