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6662 results Most recent
  • Forecast of critical wave groups from surface elevation snapshots

    Authors

    Gunther F Clauss ; Sascha Kosleck ; Daniel Testa et al.

    Date published

    2007

    Abstract

    Despite all efforts made in increasing safety of ships by optimising their structure to resist heavier seas the impact of an extreme single wave like a Freakwave wave groups like the Three Sisters or wave trains with adverse frequency characteristics will always represent exceptionally dangerous situations. As forces and motions induced by such waves can be enormous these situations should be avoided whenever possible. A method is presented to calculate the wave train a ship will encounter from surface elevation snapshots of the surrounding sea taken by the ship radar. The time-dependent surface elevation snapshot far ahead of the ship is transferred into frequency domain by the use of FFT (Fast Fourier Transformation). The resulting complex Fourier spectrum given over the inverse wavelength 1-L is converted into an amplitude spectrum and a phase spectrum. By shifting the phase spectrum to the position of the cruising ship the encountering waves can in turn be calculated in advance - depending on speed. The permanent processing of incoming snapshots delivers a continuous prediction of the water surface elevation at the position of the cruising ship. Based on these data the expected ship motion behaviour can be calculated continuously in time domain. In addition the response spectra resulting from the wave spectrum and the relevant RAOs are also evaluated. As wave data far ahead of the ship are used it allows a forward glance and dangerous situations particularly resonance and parametric resonance are detectable before the ship is encountering this wave train. Consequently theX31668

    Authors

    Gunther F Clauss ; Sascha Kosleck ; Daniel Testa et al.

    Date published

    2007

  • Fuel efficiency of diesel electric and superconductive propulsion systems

    Authors

    R Ross ; Douwe Stapersma ; J Bosklopper

    Date published

    2010

    Abstract

    The propulsion of Dutch Navy ships is predominantly by diesel (for LCF (air control frigates) or diesel-electric (for LPD (landing platform docks) and submarines). A new class of OPV (ocean-going patrol vessels) has a hybrid system. A new joint support ship related to the LPDs will also have electric propulsion. The debate about the merits of diesel and electric propulsion has led to an increasing share of AES (all-electric ship). The next step is AES with HTS (high temperature superconductivity) electric power generation and propulsion possibly in combination with other HTS systems like transformers and fault current limiters. HTS systems have geometric advantages as their size and weight is probably a factor 3 smaller than conventional equipment which is of great interest on board. Fuel efficiency is another important argument because of range and sustainability. A study was carried out to establish the fuel efficiency of diesel electric and HTS drive trains in the case of an LPD and OPV. Their design sailing profiles as well as an actually monitored sailing profile were applied to the three drive trains to compare the respective energy efficiencies. The results are presented. It is concluded that a set of various diesel generator sizes in combination with HTS generators and motors will be most efficient for both ship types.

    Authors

    R Ross ; Douwe Stapersma ; J Bosklopper

    Date published

    2010

  • International Journal of Maritime History Volume XX No. 1, June 2008

    Authors

    David Starkey and Malcolm Tull (eds)

    Shelf Location

    338a

    Abstract

    ARTICLES Valentina K. Tikoff, “Saint Elmo’s Orphans: Navigation Education and Training at the Royal School of San Telmo in Seville during the Eighteenth Century” / 1 William B. Leavenworth, “The Changing Landscape of Maritime Resources in Seventeenth-Century New England” / 33 Ghulam A. Nadri, “The Dutch Intra-Asian Trade in Sugar in the Eighteenth Century” / 63 Chesley W. Sanger, “Prologue to Scottish Domination of Northern Whaling: The Role of the French Revolutionary War, 1793-1801” / 97 Morten Karnøe Søndergaard, “The Rise and Fall of the North European Mackerel Fisheries in the Nineteenth Century” / 115 Henry Chen, “Japan and the Birth of Takao’s Fisheries in Nanyo, 1895-1945” / 133 Chih-lung Lin, “British Shipping in the Orient, 1933-1939: Reasons for Its Failure to Compete” / 153 Morten Hahn-Pedersen, “The Impact of North Sea Oil and Gas on a Danish Region” / 173 RESEARCH NOTES Alston Kennerley, “Stoking the Boilers: Firemen and Trimmers in British Merchant Ships, 1850-1950” / 191 David J. Clarke, “The Development of a Pioneering Steamship Line: William Wheelwright and the Origins of the Pacific Steam Navigation Company” / 221 FORUM: THE GLOBAL FISH MARKET, C. 1850-2005 Morten Karnøe Søndergaard and Chris Reid, “Global Fisheries History: International Perspectives on Fisheries Markets, c. 1850-2005” / 251 Olivier Levasseur and Darin Kinsey, “The Second Empire Legacy of the French ‘Culture’ of Oysters” / 253 Nobutake Koiwa, “The Development of Trade in Marine Products and the Transformation of the Japanese Fisheries” / 269 Jesús M. Martínez Milán, “Integrating Western Saharan Coastal Fisheries into the International Economy, 1885-1975” / 281

    Authors

    David Starkey and Malcolm Tull (eds)

    Publisher

    International Maritime Economic History Association, 2008

    Shelf Location

    338a

  • Manoeuvring with Pods: model tests and sea trial of M-S Costa Atlantica

    Authors

    Risto Kurimo ; Lennart Bystrom

    Date published

    2003

    Abstract

    M-S Costa Atlantica is the first in a series of six Panamax-size cruise ships. In this size range it is the first contracted vessel to be designed from the start with azimuthing pods as the main propulsors. Results of the manoeuvring trials of this ship are presented. In addition to standard turning circle and zig-zag manoeuvring tests the test program included some special manoeuvres such as the man overboard rescue manoeuvre and some turning circle tests and zig-zag manoeuvres with only one pod unit active in propulsion or in steering. Manoeuvring characteristics of the ship are compared to the criteria in the Interim Standards for Ship Manoeuvrability of the IMO. Results of the manoeuvring trials are further compared to the manoeuvring model test results which are also presented. Correlation between full- and model scale results is discussed. The model tests are carried out with a free-running (free-sailing) model in the scale of 1:47 and thus there are many scale effects between experiments with 6 m model and the corresponding trials with a 260 m vessel. A mathematical simulation model is used to study some of these scale effects by performing manoeuvring simulations in model-scale as well as in full-scale.

    Authors

    Risto Kurimo ; Lennart Bystrom

    Date published

    2003

  • Maritime air pollution prevention regulations from the view of a classification society

    Authors

    Hans-J Goetze

    Date published

    2004

    Abstract

    This paper addresses the advent of Annex 6 to the MARPOL 73-78 Convention. It sheds light on the complex issue of the air pollution prevention regulations and gives guidance on how to proceed to achieve the required certificates. Once Annex 6 is in force an IAPP (international air pollution prevention certificate) will be issued for any ship of 400 gross tonnage or over and other specified criteria irrespective the vessel's age. Ships built before Annex 6 comes into force will be provided with an IAPP certificate no later than the first scheduled dry-docking after it comes into force but in no case later than three years after that date. The essential regulations of MARPOL Annex 6 are briefly specified also giving survey regimes. For vessels built since 1 January2000 the vessel's certificate is essentially based on the NOx emission certificates to be issued for each diesel engine on board which has a power output of more than 130 kW (EIAPP - engine international air pollution prevention certificate). The MEPC (Maritime Environment Protection Committee) of IMO has encouraged all parties involved to apply the requirements prior to Annex 6 combing into force. Since the late 1990s this was followed by engine manufacturers and classification societies (the latter acting as certifying organizations recognised by numerous flag States' Administrations). Present experience in the engine certification process is reflected upon especially that influenced by the prerequisites for the approval of engine families and engine groups

    Authors

    Hans-J Goetze

    Date published

    2004

  • New model for calculating dynamic bearing reactions of marine shafting

    Authors

    Geng Houcai ; Zhong Yinghua ; Chen Bin

    Date published

    2004

    Abstract

    a new model of a marine shafting is established in this paper in order to calculate dynamic bearing reactions. In this new model the hydrodynamic excitations of propeller the characteristics of the oil films of bearings and th rigidity of the pedestal-hull system of a specific type of ships are taken into cosideration. The modeling process of the marine shafting is as follows: Firstly the rational alignment model of the shafting is set up and the relativestatic reactions of the shafting bearings are calculated. Secondly the static and the dynamic rigidities of pedestal-hull system are calculated based on the finite element model (FEM) of the stern part of the ship and the bearing forces of the hydrodynamic excitations of propeller are also calculated according the wake data obtained from model tests. Thirdly the FEM of the oil films of shafting bearings is developed according to the Renault Equation in order to obtain their dynamic characteristics. The new dynamic model of the marine shafting is established. In order to verify the new model the movements of the shafts centers at three definite shaft sections are measured during the sea trial of the vessel and the test results are compared with those calculated theoretically according to the new dynamic model. It is found from comparison that the new dynamic model is credible.

    Authors

    Geng Houcai ; Zhong Yinghua ; Chen Bin

    Date published

    2004

  • Oceanology International OI 69 8 February 1969 Brighton Volume 1 of 5

    Authors

    OI

    Shelf Location

    217f

    Abstract

    Conf held in Brighton 8 Feb 1969 Papers are Economic deposits of heavy mineral placers on the worlds continental shelves Surveys on the continental shelf around Britain A Monte Carlo simulation for predicting the feasibility of deep ocean mining operations Automation in offshore prospecting and mining Present and future aspects of ocean mining Tendencies of development in methods of maritime geophysics for the investigation of the underground Possibility of on site analysis of deep sea floor mineral deposits Deepwater exploitation of oil and gas in the decade ahead Methods and techniques of searching for granular deposits of useful minerals on the inshore part of the shelf Synoptic sampling from merchant ships An instrumented underwater towed vehicle Life in the ocean depths Glass instrument housings for deep ocean use Some instruments for monitoring the performance of undersea mechanical devices A deep sea electrical resistivity probing device Recent developments in dissolved oxygen sensing for oceanographic research A wide band piezo electric transducer for oceanographic soundings Broadband hydro acoustic sources for high resolution sub bottom profiling On the near sea floor current meter Automatic high speed particle size analysis in oceanography The absolute measurement of sound velocityX20502 Oceanology International 1972 OI CONFV

    Authors

    OI

    Publisher

    BPS Exh

    Shelf Location

    217f

    Date published

    1969

  • Oceanology International OI 69 8 February 1969 Brighton Volume 2 of 5

    Authors

    OI

    Shelf Location

    217f

    Abstract

    Conf held in Brighton 8 Feb 1969 Papers are Economic deposits of heavy mineral placers on the worlds continental shelves Surveys on the continental shelf around Britain A Monte Carlo simulation for predicting the feasibility of deep ocean mining operations Automation in offshore prospecting and mining Present and future aspects of ocean mining Tendencies of development in methods of maritime geophysics for the investigation of the underground Possibility of on site analysis of deep sea floor mineral deposits Deepwater exploitation of oil and gas in the decade ahead Methods and techniques of searching for granular deposits of useful minerals on the inshore part of the shelf Synoptic sampling from merchant ships An instrumented underwater towed vehicle Life in the ocean depths Glass instrument housings for deep ocean use Some instruments for monitoring the performance of undersea mechanical devices A deep sea electrical resistivity probing device Recent developments in dissolved oxygen sensing for oceanographic research A wide band piezo electric transducer for oceanographic soundings Broadband hydro acoustic sources for high resolution sub bottom profiling On the near sea floor current meter Automatic high speed particle size analysis in oceanography The absolute measurement of sound velocityX20502 Oceanology International 1972 OI CONFV

    Authors

    OI

    Publisher

    BPS Exh

    Shelf Location

    217f

    Date published

    1969

  • Options for non-indigenous species control and their economic impact on the Great Lakes and St Lawrence Seaway: a survey

    Authors

    Anastassios N Perakis ; Zhiyong Yang

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    NIS (non-indigenous) species cause substantial economic and ecological problems in the US and other countries with marine trade. In the absence of natural predators the NIS often become dominant in their new environment which threatens aquatic biodiversity. Current legislation and regulations require mandatory ballast water exchange for those ships entering the Great Lakes. The literature on ballast water management is surveyed and its application to the Great Lakes is discussed. The current US and international regulations and legislation for ballast water management are introduced. Due to the low compliance rate and some inherent defects of legislation the current status of NIS control is not very encouraging. Several technical and legislative options have been proposed to improve the efficiency of NIS control. The most promising methods include filtration with ultraviolet heat and ballast water exchange. No one method however can 100 per cent effectively solve the NIS problem. Moreover the mandatory requirements may induce modal shifts from marine to rail or truck mode on the Great Lakes which may cause several adverse side effects on the economy and the environment. The expected economic impact of mandatory treatment requirements is discussed. The possible modal shifts in the Great Lakes region due to increased marine freight rates and their impacts are also discussed. The decision problems for the cargo owners and the legislative body are modelled. Conclusions are summarised.

    Authors

    Anastassios N Perakis ; Zhiyong Yang

    Date published

    2006

  • Ship economics

    Authors

    K MacDonald

    Shelf Location

    204c

    Abstract

    Fourth edition This is a revised and enlarged edition. This revision has been rendered necessary on account of the advances made during recent year in all details of ship construction, fittings and equipment, and regulations pertaining thereto. New chapters were added on Classification Surveys, Load Line Survey, Refrigerated Machinery and Plant Surveys, Survey for Passenger and Safety Certificate, Survey of Lights, Sound Signals and Life-saving Appliances, Annual Radio Survey, Inspection of provisions. Particulars of ship deratization, and also inspections, tests, etc., in connexion with the Docks Regulations (Factory Acts), are included. References to the Gyro Compass, the Echo-sounder, and the Wireless Direction Finder are made, since such aids to navigation are now in common use. The purposes to the book is therefore objects and it is hoped the few hints contained therein will, at least, provide the means of timely deliverance, and enable the seaman to act on his own initiative when called upon (1) to survey the damage to his own ship and prepare an intelligent report to his owners, (2) to estimate the approximate cost of repairs and draw up the necessary specification for tenders, (3) to supervise personally all repairs in hand and to satisfy himself that every details of the work contracted for is being honestly and efficiently carried out in conformity with the rules of the Classification Society in which the vessel is classed – not forgetting the usual attention to quality of new material and the preservation of strength where the old is replaced.

    Authors

    K MacDonald

    Publisher

    George Phillip

    Shelf Location

    204c

    Date published

    1939

  • Status review on fatigue performance of fillet welds

    Authors

    Stephen J Maddox

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    A recent joint-industry project addressing the fatigue design of weld details in FPSOs focused on potential fatigue failure from weld toes in joints between the main hull longitudinal stiffeners and transverse bulkheads. However there is also the potential for fatigue failure in the weld itself particularly in fillet welds that are fully load carrying. Therefore a second phase of the project included analysis and fatigue testing of fillet welded joints under the complex stressing conditions that can arise in ships with the aim of developing suitable design methods. As a prelude to that work a critical review of current design practice its basis and available background data was carried out. This paper presents this critical review which includes background and relevant experimental data for assessing the fatigue performance of steel fillet welds with respect to failure in the weld throat. The main focus is on fillet or partial penetration welds in cruciform T or lap joints under transverse loading failing by fatigue crack growth across the weld throat under normal stresses. The review covers the influence of residual stress applied mean stress joint fit-up and alignment weld quality the use of coated steel the need for a plate thickness correction and calculation of the optimum weld size. Also considered are cases of fillet welds failing in shear or combined normal and shear stresses.

    Authors

    Stephen J Maddox

    Date published

    2005

  • Thermographic method for fatigue prediction of friction stir welded light alloy panels in shipbuilding

    Authors

    Marco Biot ; Vincenzo Crupi ; Giacomo Risitano et al.

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    Designers of HSV (high-speed vessels) resort to light-weight design concepts since the hull weight plays a crucial role in the performance of such ships. Aluminium alloys appear certainly to be the best choice. However such material may be more prone to fatigue collapse and therefore aluminium alloy welded joints can be considered to be areas of weakness in a ship's structure. The fatigue behaviour of these joints is considered. The traditional methods for fatigue assessment of welded joints have some limitations and are extremely time consuming. In order to overcome these difficulties Risitano's method based on thermographic analysis is applied to predict the fatigue behaviour of welds. Experimental tests have been carried out to assess and compare the high-cycle endurance limits of different welded joints obtained by means of FSW (friction stir welding) and MIG techniques. The results obtained resorting to the TM (Thermographic Method) show good agreement with those derived from the experimental data represented through S-N curves. This is the first step in a research programme for the fatigue strength assessment of light alloy welded joints used in ship construction. Further research developments are outlined.

    Authors

    Marco Biot ; Vincenzo Crupi ; Giacomo Risitano et al.

    Date published

    2005

  • Transportation of dangerous goods by sea and inland waterways Vol I

    Authors

    Canadian Comttee ICHCA

    Shelf Location

    213c

    Abstract

    Seventh Int Symp held in Vancouver Sept 27 - 30 1982 Papers are The technical operational implications and the shipping industrys contribution Investigations on gas explosion accidents on combination carriers Application of damage stability criteria to chemical tankers IMO code of safe practice for solid bulk cargoes (BC code) Some problems of hazard evaluation of solid bulk cargoes Too many fires in the iron Direct reduced iron Carriage of coal by sea from United States ports The Venezuelan experience in the handling and shipment of hot molded DRI briquettes Improving dangerous goods documentation Bulk carriage of dangerous goods in ISO tank containers Flame arresting devices on tank containers and tank wagons for th carriage of inflammable liquids Specific problems related to safe transport handling and stowage of dangerous goods in containers Total inter - modality - a shippers point of view The carriage of dangerous goods Restraint of dangerous goods cargo on Roll on Roll Off ships RoRo transport of dangerous goods Matson - a versatile fleet The barging of bulk liquid hazardous materials on the US inland waterway system West coast barging operations Dangerous cargo and people Gas ship technology - past achievements and futur goals Transportation of LNG from the Arctic by commercial submarine Struct design of Arctic vessels designed for hazardous cargoes classification aspects Analysis of the risks inherent in the importation of LPG in bulk to four sit in the Netherlands Inland waterways in the United Kingdom Hazardous goods in the St Lawrence seaway

    Authors

    Canadian Comttee ICHCA

    Publisher

    ICHCA

    Shelf Location

    213c

    Date published

    1982

  • Developing strategies and tools for the efficient trial and acceptance of marine and weapon systems in an integrated electric propulsion warship

    Authors

    Lt Roy Utting ; Sophie Shaughnessy ; Lt Paul Carroll

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    The constant drive to reduce costs and the sheer scale of shore testing facilities required for large scale IEP projects such as the UK's Future Aircraft Carrier (CVF) have meant that the risk associated with testing and acceptance is being driven towards the harbour and sea trials phases of a ship's life. This paper discusses how best to understand manage and mitigate these risks through an examination of the implications of aligning of alignment marine system acceptance with overall combat system acceptance. Starting with a review of the factors influencing the timing of IEP system integration testing and trials comparison is then made with the current status of weapon system acceptance with overall combat system acceptance. Starting with a review of the factors influencing the timing of IEP system integration testing and trials comparison is then made with the current status of weapon system acceptance in the Royal Navy. Lessons from recent trials in RN ships and the development of a quick look analysis software package to prove weapon system performance have been used to illustrate some aspects of the interaction between the combat and IEP systems alongside the possible benefits of an interface between the combat system highway and PMS. In conclusion the paper identifies that a full characterisation of the performance of marine systems in an IEP ship will increasingly be linked to the proving of the combat system and therefore the acceptance of boX37755 Developing systems for successful pro-active environmental management P Lightburn ; A Mitchell

    Authors

    Lt Roy Utting ; Sophie Shaughnessy ; Lt Paul Carroll

    Date published

    2006

  • Cocktail for an incident: poor understanding of human factors concepts lack of situational awareness and poor CRM (crew resource management) skills

    Authors

    Guillermo A G Garay

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    It is shown here how poor understanding of SA (Situational Awareness) together with a lack of transfer of CRM (Crew Resource Management) knowledge into skills and a poor understanding of HF (Human Factors) concepts can very rapidly affect a situation turning it from a normal situation into a highly dangerous one without team members becoming aware of the change. It is also shown how such a risky situation could easily have been avoided and managed safely just by applying some well-known rules. A real incident is presented (anonymity preserved) in which a particular relation between the CRM training that officers received their HF knowledge and how they managed the level of SA all impacted on the final outcome. It is observed that no matter how good the training provided is this will only contribute 50% to the safety pathway. The remaining 50% will only be achieved by ensuring the transfer of the knowledge received into practical skills and that task can only be completed on board ships by reinforcing the CRM concepts the HF knowledge and enhancing SA during daily operational activities. In order to ensure this happens a two-part strategy is recommended. The first part is to twice accompany each vessel in order to coach and mentor bridge-teams underway with regard to CRM HF and SA; and to deliver refresher training to address the gaps identified. The second strategy is to provide CBT (computer-based training) to the fleet which emulates realistic voyages and provides educational CRMX44701

    Authors

    Guillermo A G Garay

    Date published

    2006

  • A guide for the analysis of ship structures

    Authors

    Thein Wah (editor) Prepared for the Ship Structure Committee under direction of the Committee on Ship Structural Design, National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council

    Shelf Location

    235e

    Abstract

    The primary aim of this guide is to provide a compact reference work for the use of ship structural designers. It is also intended for use by research workers in the area of ship structural analysis and allied fields. Chapter 1 gives an historical introduction to ship structures; Chapter 2 discusses the motions of ships and loading conditions which form the basis for the design of ship structures. Chapter 3 outlines those elements of vibration theory that are considered to be of most interest to ship designers, presents results from vibration theory which may be of immediate application in design problems and relates these directly to the problem of ship structural dynamics. The remaining 10 chapters contain the structural analysis portion of the Guide. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 contain analytical data on plating under different kinds of loads, e.g. in-plane and lateral, together with a discussion of the limitations and range of applicability of the theoretical results. Chapter 7 is concerned with problems with the design of bulkheads, bottom structures and deck plating that have to be considered by the ship designer in proportioning scantlings. These include problems involving such topics as grillage analysis, minimum weight design, and stress concentration at points of load concentration. Chapter 8 analyses stress concentrations around openings in plating and introduces shear lag methods of resolving the problems. Chapter 9 deals with the methods of box-girder analysis that are useful in studying the longitudinal strength of the ship. Chapter 10 discusses the ship's transverse structure and includes an introduction to plastic design methods for frames. Chapter 11 gives a detailed treatment of connections, Chapter 12 deals with the manner in which temperature may influence the load carrying capacity and deformational characteristics of the ship's structure. The last chapter is a broad survey of mechanics of materials with particular emphasis on its role in ship structural analysis.

    Authors

    Thein Wah (editor) Prepared for the Ship Structure Committee under direction of the Committee on Ship Structural Design, National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council

    Publisher

    United States Department of Commerce, Office of Technical Services

    Shelf Location

    235e

    Date published

    0.196

  • Lloyd's Register Technology Day 2011

    Authors

    Lloyd's Register Tim Kent. Vince Jenkins. Bernard Twomey and Renny Smith. Paul James. Jim Barclay. Dalibor Vlaši . David Howarth and Jian-Zhong Zhang. Frank Lin, Nigel White, Michael Johnson, Zhenhong Wang, Dave Brennan, John Wallace, Eric Li and Ron Wa

    Shelf Location

    346b

    Abstract

    Also available online http://www.lr.org/sectors/marine/documents/206831-technology-days-papers-2011.aspx Contents 1. Safety, the Environment and Economics: A Classification Society’s Role and Responsibility. Tim Kent. 2. The Use of Risk-Based Techniques in Evaluating Novel Engineering Concepts. Vince Jenkins. 3. Challenges of Systems Assurance for the Marine Sector. Bernard Twomey and Renny Smith. 4. Classification: An Assurance Process. Paul James. 5. Developments in Port State Control. Jim Barclay. 6. Tug Safety: Some Conclusions from the SAFETUG II Research Programme. Dalibor Vlaši 7. Corrosion: Its Impact on Modern Shipping with Particular Reference to Crude Oil Tankers. David Howarth and Jian-Zhong Zhang. 8. Evolution of the Hydrodynamic Analysis Capability in ShipRight. Frank Lin, Nigel White, Michael Johnson, Zhenhong Wang, Dave Brennan, John Wallace, Eric Li and Ron Watanabe. 9. Observations of Cavitation on Propellers.Patrick Fitzsimmons. 10. Coupled Fluid-Structure Simulation of Mild Steel Plates Subjected to Close-Proximity Underwater Explosion Loading. Timothy Dunbar, Robert Ripley, Rick Link, Derrick Alexander and Dave Whitehouse. 11. Tanker Structural Vibration Investigations. Peter Filcek. 12. Ice Interaction Dynamics: Full Scale Measurements of an Inter-Island Icebreaking Ferry. Robert Bridges,Steve Kavanagh and Patrick Fitzsimmons. 13. Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) for Marine Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control. Zabi Bazari and Paul McStay. 14. Gas Fuelled Ships: Fundamentals, Benefits, Classification and Operational Issues. Andrew Smith and Joseph Morelos. 15. Sustainable Marine Power – The Methapu Project. Ed Fort. In addition to the fifteen papers above, two guest speakers also delivered lectures at this year's Technology Days: 1. Innovation of Shipping by Technology. Bo Cerup-Simonsen,Vice President, Head of Maersk Maritime Technology,A.P. Møller Maersk A/S. Copenhagen. 2. Developments in Marine Engine Technology. Professor Constantine Arcoumanis FREng. Deputy Vice-Chancellor, City University. London.

    Authors

    Lloyd's Register Tim Kent. Vince Jenkins. Bernard Twomey and Renny Smith. Paul James. Jim Barclay. Dalibor Vlaši . David Howarth and Jian-Zhong Zhang. Frank Lin, Nigel White, Michael Johnson, Zhenhong Wang, Dave Brennan, John Wallace, Eric Li and Ron Wa

    Publisher

    Lloyd's Register

    Shelf Location

    346b

    Date published

    2011

  • Qualitative and quantitative validation of a numerical code for the realistic simulation of various ship motion scenarios

    Authors

    Janou Hennig ; Heike Billerbeck ; Gunther F Clauss et al.

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    Simulation programs have improved significantly in recent years and are routinely considered in the design process at shipyards and for the basic investigation of ship safety. There is ongoing discussion about safety guidelines given recent developments in ship design. Numerical simulations of ship motions are considered to be a powerful tool in the safety evaluation of a given design. However the subsequent use of numerical codes calls for their thorough validation which has to be carried out both qualitatively and quantitatively. The focus here is on a code used and further developed by the Flensburg Shipyard. In order to validate this code the capsising scenario in steep wave sequences is first realised in the wave tank. The dedicated computer controlled experimental technique ensures the exact phase correlation of wave excitation and resultant ship motions. Thus the registered wave and the track of the ship model in the model test serve as input to the numerical simulation which results in the specific motion time traces. These are now directly compared to the motion registrations from the model tests. First results of the validation by direct comparison of time series have been presented in earlier publications still with the restriction that only a few cases have been investigated. Here the promising method is applied to another scenario in a long-crested sea state including steep wave combinations. Different aspects are discussed which result in the conclusion that the method is feasible for free running ships in stern and sternX33504 A qualitative comparison between some large-scale grounding tests

    Authors

    Janou Hennig ; Heike Billerbeck ; Gunther F Clauss et al.

    Date published

    2005

  • Structural fire protection in high-speed vessels: a new look at an old problem

    Authors

    George F Wright ; Michael T de Bettencourt

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    A traditional approach to structural fire protection is not compatible with the needs of high-speed vessels. Many high-speed vessels use lightweight materials such as aluminium and fibreglass. This need for lightweight is in conflict with the traditional methods of vessel structural fire protection. The needs of the newer high-speed vessels necessitate different rules. In 1978 the IMO adopted a set of rules to accommodate these needs. The IMO's Code of Safety for DSC (dynamically supported craft) allowed for a lesser degree of intrinsic passive fire protection with allowances for limited operation area extensive operational controls over the vessels and reliable rescue resource availability should a problem occur. Most significant in the rules is the need for the passengers to be rapidly removed from the vessel in the event of fire or other emergency. The existing DSC Code is now in the process of being revised. The new Code is called the IMO Code of Safety for HSC (high-speed craft). The HSC Code incorporates many of the lessons learned from the operation of these vessels over the last decade. The application of these standards to the HSC in the San Diego area has been challenging. The focus here is on how the rules and the philosophy of the various Codes are affected by the structural fire protection schemes of these vessels and the impact upon other aspects of the vessel's design and operation. Some of the lessons learned by the Coast Guard Marine Safety Office personnel in San Diego while carrying out an inspection of several high-speed craft are detailed. The report concludX19139 Structural fire protection of cargo ships and guidance on the requirements of the merchant shipping (fire protection) regulations 1984 I G Noble

    Authors

    George F Wright ; Michael T de Bettencourt

    Date published

    2006

  • An experimental approach for the prediction of full-scale forces acting on the submerged control surfaces of a new WIG vehicle

    Authors

    D Dessi ; F Pistani

    Date published

    2002

    Abstract

    The prediction of the performances of hydrofoils especially for fast vessels where these foils are used to control pitch and roll motion is quite a difficult task. Different phenomena have to be taken into account: fixed and vortex cavitation relevant free-surface effect flow interaction with the strut bearing the hydrofoil. This is the case of the SP-HC-WIG (surface piercing hydrofoil controlled wing-in-ground effect) vehicle which is a new concept vessel designed to transport payload at cruising speeds beyond the limit of conventional high-speed ships. Using a numerical approach that accounts for all the outlined phenomena is quite complicated and the reliability of the results obtained is dependent on comparison with experimental data. As a result an experimental approach to this problem at least in the preliminary stage of design is still preferred. The results of the experimental campaign carried out in the frame of the BEHSP (Brite-Euram Seabus-Hydaer Project) are reported. BEHSP is a research program that aims to explore the feasibility of such a vehicle. This test campaign focuses on the hydrofoils of the Seabus-Hydaer vehicle. By measuring the forces acting on these submerged control surfaces for different speeds and scales (including also some cavitation tests) tentative values of the forces acting upon the full-scale vehicle at cruise speeds are issued overcoming the unavoidable lack of similarity in the performed tests. Different combinations of conditions are investigated during the tests in particular different angles of attack of the control surface and various incomingX36331 Experimental approach to the interaction between nozzle-propeller and ice block

    Authors

    D Dessi ; F Pistani

    Date published

    2002