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22981 results Most recent
  • Uniform national discharge standards - overview and implications for future naval engineering

    Authors

    David F Kopack ; Gordon D Smith ; Don K Kim et al.

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    The National Defence Authorisation Act (1996) contains an amendment to the Clean Water Act which provides the DoD and the EPA with authority to jointly establish standards for incidental discharges from Armed Forces' vessels. The uniform national standards would apply to discharges from vessels of the Navy Military Sealift Command Army Marine Corps Air Force and Coast Guard to the navigable waters and contiguous zone of the US and its territories. UNDS (uniform national discharge standards) will require control of discharges by either a technology or management practice. UNDS will facilitate the Armed Forces' ability to better design and build future vessels to be environmentally sound and to maintain the operational flexibility of Armed Forces' vessels both domestically and internationally. The development of standards for Armed Forces' vessel discharges may have greater impact on naval engineering requirements for future vessels than any other single environmental issue. These standards are expected to stimulate the development of innovative vessel pollution control technologies which can be used for both Armed Forces' vessels and commercial shipping vessels. An overview of UNDS development is presented. The results of UNDS Phase 1 are summarised and the preliminary approach for accomplishing UNDS Phase 2 is summarised in overview. Implications for future naval engineering efforts are discussed.

    Authors

    David F Kopack ; Gordon D Smith ; Don K Kim et al.

    Date published

    2006

  • Volunteer landsmen recruits to the Royal Navy 1795-1811: the case of three Thames-built frigates

    Authors

    Nick Slope

    Date published

    2004

    Abstract

    No problem more vexed the Admiralty in wartime than how to provide the vast numbers of men required to sail and fight the fleet. This was a qualitative as well as a quantitative problem. The very technical nature of sailing vessels required for the most part a skilled and experienced workforce. About one quarter of the men could be unskilled but the rest required some skill or experience. The Royal Navy used a number of recruitment methods in order to obtain the manpower it required. The two mainstays of recruitment were the use of the press gang and encouraging men to volunteer for service in the Royal Navy. Many recruits deserted. One particular aspect of recruitment is considered - volunteers or more precisely landsmen volunteers. These men were volunteers for the Royal Navy who had no previous seagoing experience and were thus rated 'landsmen'. A question that concerns the Navy as a provider or consumer of seamen is did the Royal Navy of the French Wars period rely on the merchant fleet for its supply of trained seamen or did it also train up 'landsmen' to the level of competent seaman.

    Authors

    Nick Slope

    Date published

    2004

  • A model-based system for simultaneously estimating bathymetry and sound speed profile characteristics - non-isovelocity simulation results

    Authors

    D B Cousins ; J H Miller

    Date published

    2002

    Abstract

    Traditional sonar-based bathymetric mapping relies upon accurate measurement of the SSP (sound speed profile) in the area being surveyed as errors in this measurement translate directly into erroneous bathymetry measurements. The SSP is usually measured directly using CTD (instrument) casts a method that is quite time consuming. In order to be most effective surveys must be able to measure the SSP in-situ and in real-time due the high variability of estuarine and coastal waters. This is not practical to do using just CTD casts. Further developments are presented of an ABE (adaptive bathymetric estimation) algorithm for use with forward-looking bathymetric sonar in non-isovelocity underwater acoustic environments. In addition to providing improved positional estimates of ocean bottom contacts in front of the host vehicle it automatically estimates and adapts to changes in the local SSP (sound speed profile). The ABE (adaptive bathymetric estimation) algorithm provides a solution to this problem by estimating and correcting for SSP characteristics on the fly. Two extensions to ABE are presented. The first uses a discrete bottom model and increases the complexity of the SSP that can be modelled by the system. Simulation results of both n-linear and n2 -linear SSP environments are presented. The latter are so named for the dependency of sound speed versus depth. The second extension adapts the ABE algorithm to a different environment where the bottom is modelled as a featureless constant slope with no discrete reference points to serve as sonar contacts (the smootX44764 Model-based tracking for autonomous arrays M B Porter

    Authors

    D B Cousins ; J H Miller

    Date published

    2002

  • Lloyd's Register Technology Day 2010

    Authors

    Lloyd's Register Vaughan Pomeroy. David J Howarth. Shengming Zhang and Imtaz Khan. Spyros Hirdaris, Nigel White, Negin Angoshtari, Mike Johnson, Yongwon Lee and Norbert Bakkers.Alex Johnston, David Howarth, Helena Polezhayeva,Jimmy Tong, Sai Wong, Clive

    Shelf Location

    346b

    Abstract

    Contents also available online http://www.lr.org/sectors/marine/Researchandtechnology/ 1. 250 Years of Marine Technology Development. Vaughan Pomeroy. 2. Shipyard Fabrication and its Quality Control: Some Problems and Solutions. David J Howarth and John Durkin. 3. Ultimate Strength of Ship Structures. Shengming Zhang and Imtaz Khan. 4. Ship Loads: Current Developments and Future Directions. Spyros Hirdaris, Nigel White, Negin Angoshtari, Mike Johnson, Yongwon Lee and Norbert Bakkers. 5. Recent Developments in Fatigue. Alex Johnston, David Howarth, Helena Polezhayeva, Jimmy Tong, Sai Wong, Clive Badger and Tom Ward. 6. The Acoustic Emission Technique: Application to Marine Structures and Machinery. Len Rogers and John Carlton. 7. The Formation of Freak Ocean Waves. William Bateman. 8. Reflections on Copenhagen: Marine Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Anne-Marie Warris and Zabi Bazari. 9. Trainee Engineer Lecture Validation of the Design Temperatures Used in the Provisional Rules for the Winterisation of Ships. Charlotte Vie of Cambridge University. Winner of the 2010 Trainee Engineers’ technical paper competition. 10. Ship – Ice Interaction. Andrew Smith and Robert Bridges. 11. SOLAS 2009 Stability Requirements: Implementation. Jane Dodman. 12. Failures of Medium Speed Diesel Engines and Machinery. Peter Filcek. 13. The Simulation of Cavitation Erosion under Laboratory Conditions. Reddy Devalapalli, Dalibor Vlaši´c, Colin Waylen and Constantinos Zegos. 14. Advanced CFD Techniques Applied to Practical Ship Problems. Dejan Radosavljevic and Stewart Whitworth. 15. System Design and Integration. Vaughan Pomeroy, Bernard Twomey and Renny Smith. 16. Nuclear Propulsion of Merchant Ships – Aspects of Risk and Regulation. John Carlton, Vince Jenkins and Bob Smart. 17. Trainee Engineer Lecture Kite Assisted Propulsion: Fiction or Reality? – A Class Perspective, Tristan Chapman, Marine Surveyor and former Lloyd’s Register Graduate Trainee, Southampton University. Runner-up in the 2010 Trainee Engineers’ technical paper competition. In addition to the seventeen papers above, two guest speakers also delivered lectures at this year's Technology Days: 1. Technical Needs of a Ship Owner from a Classification Society. Robert Thompson, First Deputy Managing Director, UNICOM. Cyprus. 2. Technical Needs of a Shipbuilder from a Classification Society. Mr. C.H. Park, Senior Executive Vice President, Samsung Heavy Industries. South Korea.

    Authors

    Lloyd's Register Vaughan Pomeroy. David J Howarth. Shengming Zhang and Imtaz Khan. Spyros Hirdaris, Nigel White, Negin Angoshtari, Mike Johnson, Yongwon Lee and Norbert Bakkers.Alex Johnston, David Howarth, Helena Polezhayeva,Jimmy Tong, Sai Wong, Clive

    Publisher

    Lloyd's Register

    Shelf Location

    346b

    Date published

    2010

  • Occupational Accident Models - Where have we been and where are we going?

    Authors

    Daryl Attwood; Faisal Khan; Brian Veitch

    Publisher

    Elsevier; 2006

    Abstract

    Oil and gas accident statistics reveal that workers’ potential for injury or death from occupational accidents is at least as high as that associated with explosions, fires, and other major incidents. The authors’ contribution to the ongoing efforts to improve the situation is a holistic, quantitative model capable of predicting occupational accident frequency. Model inputs include external, corporate and direct factors, and the approach includes methods often favoured by professionals from the safety, engineering, and psychology disciplines. As a precursor to model development, a comprehensive literature review was conducted. One objective of the review was to understand the previous approaches taken by other researchers and thereby identify any gaps in the knowledge. The lack of a holistic, quantitative model addressing occupational accidents in the oil and gas industry was established. A second objective was to select and categorise the factors most influential in the accident process and thereby provide a foundation for the present model. Optimal choices required a systematic study of the factors proposed by other researchers. The literature studied has been summarised in this paper, subdivided into two primary groups: (i) descriptions of existing accident models, and (ii) analyses of existing data. In addition, descriptions of literature specifically concerned with two key elements in the occupational accident process, human factors and safety culture, have been included Based on the literature reviewed, the novelty of the present model has been discussed. The systematic approach taken to choose the factors thought most influential in the occupational accident process, and which were therefore included in the model, has been described. Some details of the proposed model have been included.

    Authors

    Daryl Attwood; Faisal Khan; Brian Veitch

    Date published

    2006

    Publisher

    Elsevier; 2006

  • No need of additives in a new system for semi-permanent use of lubricating oil without oil renewal Paper no. 74

    Authors

    Morio Sumimoto ; Isao Kimura ; Tadanori Azuma

    Shelf Location

    224a

    Abstract

    CIMAC Congress 2004 - Kyoto A new technology has been developed to enable LO (lubricating oil) to be used semi-permanently and thus reduce LO consumption. This technology keeps LO clean just as the kidney of an animal keeps its blood clean. The technology is therefore called the kidney system. It is sufficient to simply top-up sometimes with a small amount of fresh oil to compensate for oil loss. The system has shown itself to work well in about 1000 units of marine and cogeneration diesel engines and in many hydraulic machines for many years. The results also show that the technology remarkably improves the reliability of machines. An additional feature is that the kidney system needs no additives (these are even judged to be harmful). All these features are as a result of the fact that the kidney system is able to remove LO sludge soon after it is generated and that it is able to remove not only large sludge particles but also very fine ones. The key element of the system is a new type of filter in which many sheets of filter paper are arranged in parallel and contaminated LO flows between them. As this happens sludge particles sit on the surface of the filter paper and are thus removed from the LO. The results of the kidney system have been reported upon previously elsewhere. Therefore here the emphasis is mainly upon the field data that show why no additives are needed and why they are harmful to the kidney system. Optimum contamination is also briefly discussed.

    Authors

    Morio Sumimoto ; Isao Kimura ; Tadanori Azuma

    Publisher

    CIMAC

    Shelf Location

    224a

    Date published

    2004

  • Smoke and soot reduction during in-situ burning of spilled oil using forced supplemental air to achieve improved combustion

    Authors

    James L Simmons ; Atle B Nordvik ; James M Burkes

    Date published

    2006

    Abstract

    There are three main techniques use to clean up an oil spill. The first is the use of mechanical equipment such as booms and skimmers and sorbents to corral the oil and remove it from the surface. The second is the use of chemicals either to rapidly increase the natural dispersion into the water column or to somehow modify the physical properties of the spill so as to enhance recovery. The third method is in-situ (on-site) burning. There has been significant progress in the technology of burning since the primitive attempts to ignite the spill from the Torrey Canyon wreck off Lands End England in 1967. The conditions under which oil can be burned and the equipment and procedures used have received a lot of attention over the last few years. One major obstacle to in-situ burning has been the perceived air pollution from the enormous cloud of dense black smoke that is a product of poor and incomplete combustion. The Marine Spill Response Corporation a non-profit making company dedicated to cleaning up major marine oil spills has sponsored a series of test burns to evaluate the potential of adding forced air to a boom-constrained in-situ burn in order to reduce or eliminate the black smoke and soot. These tests are presented in overview followed by the results obtained. Preliminary evaluation of the test data shows that smoke and soot can be significantly reduced or eliminated and that it appears to be technically feasible to design and use equipment to do so.

    Authors

    James L Simmons ; Atle B Nordvik ; James M Burkes

    Date published

    2006

  • The Greenwich Forum IX 'Britain and the Sea:Future Dependance, Future Opportunities'

    Authors

    conference organisers, A. J. Smith, Lady Elizabeth Kennet, M. B. F. Ranken; editor of proceedings, M. B. F. Ranken

    Shelf Location

    225c

    Abstract

    Proceedings from The Greenwich Forum IX Conference 'Britain and the Sea:Future Dependance, Future Opportunities', held at the Royal Naval College, London 14 - 16 September 1983. Papers are: Does London have a future as a world maritime centre Economic development on land or at sea Opportunities arising from North Sea development The maritime trade and transport scene today and in the future Offshore oil: responses to employment opportunities Global maritime services The sea's non-living resources present and future Living resources: utilisation and management Defence and civil power: interaction and interdependence The United Nations Law of The Sea Convention of 1982: prospects for Europe Japan in the eastern sea North-south co-operation: the Caracas declaration and unctad The case for the convention: an American view British sea policy: past achievements and future prospects Background papers are : The maritime transport industry Inland waterways in Great Britain The UK Continental Shelf: oil and gas activities The UK fish catching sector: basic problems with a need for the restructuring of the fleet The free world's sea dependance: security of use in peace, defence in war The British shipbuilding industry The British marine equipment industry The death of a tradition A trade union view of change in the shipping industry British ports industry Ports, ships and technological change The work of the IMO related to maritime safety and pollution prevention Survey of oil pollution around the coasts of the UK The role of the classification societies in the setting and maintaining of standards of ship design and condition Marine insurance: the backbone of world shipping The P and I club

    Authors

    conference organisers, A. J. Smith, Lady Elizabeth Kennet, M. B. F. Ranken; editor of proceedings, M. B. F. Ranken

    Publisher

    Edinburgh ; Scottish Academic Press Ltd

    ISBN number

    707303532

    Shelf Location

    225c

    Date published

    1984

  • A comparison of acoustic imagery of seafloor features using a towed side scan sonar and a multi-beam echosounder

    Authors

    R T DeKayzer ; J S Byrne ; J D Case et al.

    Date published

    2002

    Abstract

    Significant improvements in the quality of imagery data available from multi-beam echo sounders have recently been made. Many multi-beam bathymetric sonar systems available today provide one or more outputs of acoustic backscatter imagery. The intensity time series values are derived from the same transmit beam pattern that produces the sounding values. This sampling approach provides a dataset with co-located bathymetry and imagery. Examples of seafloor features imaged with both a Klein system 2000 towed side scan sonar and with Reson 8100 series multi-beam echo sounders are presented. The multi-beam echo sounder imagery is derived from the 'side scan' receive beams which are separate from the receive beams formed to make the bathymetric measurements. The comparison focuses on depths shallower than 40 meters and includes a variety of terrains surveyed along the North Eastern US. The areas investigated include hydrographically significant bottom features and multiple-benthic habitats imaged with both types of systems. The contribution that can be made when the multi-beam echo sounder imagery data is acquired and processed along with the bathymetry data from a multi-beam echo sounder is shown. The imagery data can provide complimentary information during the processing and analysis phases of data reduction. While the resulting imagery is not as sharp as the imagery from a towed side scan sonar the resulting dataset does offer some significant advantages. This approach can support a wide range of survey applications including: hydrography search and locate route survey Comparison of acoustic measurements of zooplankton populations using an acoustic water column profiler and an ADCP D D Lemon ; D Billenness ; J Buermans

    Authors

    R T DeKayzer ; J S Byrne ; J D Case et al.

    Date published

    2002

  • Dynamic interaction between SCR and the seabed

    Authors

    Ali Nakhaee ; Jun Zhang

    Date published

    2007

    Abstract

    The use of SCR (steel catenary risers) has increased in recent years when oil and gas production is moving to deeper and deeper waters. One of the important issues in the analysis and design of a SCR is how to estimate the interaction between the SCR and the seabed because it affects the magnitude and variation pattern of the bending moments of the SRC near its TDZ (touch down zone) and thus its fatigue life. The interaction between a SCR and seabed soil is extremely complicated in which the supporting force of soil to the riser is non-linear and time dependent and soil absorbs the energy of the motion of a SCR near its TDZ. The magnitude of soil stiffness is crucial to the fatigue life of a SCR and the damping of soil may play an important role in reducing the motion of a SCR near its TDZ. Therefore it is important to allow for a realistic behaviour of seabed soil in simulating the interactions between SCRs and the seabed and between a floating structure and its SCRs. Recent studies on the behaviour of seabed soil in interacting with risers have resulted in more realistic P-y curves of the seabed soil where P stands for the supporting force of soil and y for the vertical penetration of the riser with respect to the seabed surface. This study extends an existing finite element numerical code for dynamic analysis of mooring lines and risers known as CABLE3D to allow for the low boundary condition of a SCR at the seabed to be described by a P-y curve or an approximation of the P-y curve instead of simplified linear springs. The results of the extended CABLE3D can lead to a more accurate estimate of the fatigue life of a SCR. X19354

    Authors

    Ali Nakhaee ; Jun Zhang

    Date published

    2007

  • International Journal of Maritime History Volume XXII No. 1, June 2010

    Authors

    David Starkey (ed)

    Shelf Location

    338a

    Abstract

    ARTICLES David M. Williams, “Humankind and the Sea: The Changing Relationship since the Mid-Eighteenth Century” / 1 Evan Lampe, “‘The Most Miserable Hole in the Whole World:’ Western Sailors and the Whampoa Anchorage, 1770-1850” / 15 J.N.F.M. à Campo, “Sea and Sadness: Porteño Identity and Maritime Imagery in Tango Lyrics” / 41 Stig Tenold, “So Nice in Niches: Specialization Strategies in Norwegian Shipping, 1960-1977” / 63 Luisa Piccinno and Andrea Zanini, “The Development of Pleasure Boating and Yacht Harbours in the Mediterranean Sea: The Case of the Riviera Ligure” / 83 Alston Kennerley, “A Northwest European Shipping Communication and Servicing Hub: Falmouth for Orders, Repair and Supply, 1881-1935” / 111 Jesús Ángel Sánchez García, “Commerce and Harbour Development in the Urban Planning of the City of A Coruña during the Eighteenth Century” / 139 RESEARCH NOTES Panayiotis S. Kapetanakis, “The Ionian State in the ‘British’ Nineteenth Century, 1814-1864: From Adriatic Isolation to Atlantic Integration” / 163 Kate Jordan, “The Captains and Crews of Liverpool’s Northern Whaling Trade” / 185 REVIEW ESSAY Lincoln Paine, “Beyond the Dead White Whales: Literature of the Sea and Maritime History” / 205 SOURCE ESSAY Klas Rönnbäck, “The Sound Toll Chamber Commodity Records: Estimating the Reliability of a Potential Source for International Trade History” / 229 FORUM: ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE PORT CITIES OF THE SEA OF AZOV AND THE GREEKS IN THE LONG NINETEENTH CENTURY Gelina Harlaftis, “Economic and Social Development of the Port Cities of the Sea of Azov and the Greeks in the Long Nineteenth Century: An Introduction” / 239 Gelina Harlaftis, “Trade and Shipping in the Nineteenth-Century Sea of Azov” / 241 Katerina Papakonstantinou, “Russian and Ukrainian Archives and the Creation of Databases on the Greek Population and Their Economic Activities in Nineteenth-Century Azov Port Cities” / 252 Evrydiki Sifneos, “Merchant Enterprises and Strategies in the Sea of Azov Ports” / 259 Vassilis Colonas, “Architectural Expression of the Greeks in the Nineteenth-Century Cities of the Azov Sea Region: The Case of Taganrog” / 269

    Authors

    David Starkey (ed)

    Publisher

    International Maritime Economic History Association, 2010

    Shelf Location

    338a

  • Steady-state and transient dynamical systems analysis of uncoupled and coupled very large amplitude roll response of a vessel in regular and random waves

    Authors

    Jeffrey M Falzarano ; Srinivas Vishnubhotla ; Sarah E Juckett

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    An analysis technique for advanced naval hull forms is proposed. This technique considers the large amplitude (non-linear) dynamic roll response in waves and both the steady state (local) and transient (global) response. In addition to beginning with single degree of freedom uncoupled roll motion multiple degree of freedom roll coupled to sway and yaw motion are also analysed. Sway and yaw are the primary degrees of freedom for ship manoeuvering analysis and hence this begins to give an understanding about manoeuvering in waves. This analysis represents an alternative to traditional (static) ship stability criteria and simulation based approaches. It is more accurate than static stability approaches and more efficient than simulation-based approaches. Moreover this technique provides insight into the mechanisms that may lead to vessel capsizing. Specifically by analysing the sway and yaw motion broaching may be understood. To date the DTMB 5415 hull-form has been analysed. This represents the last traditional destroyer type hull-form built for the US Navy. Moreover the US Navy has recently proposed an alternative simulation-based approach to traditional static stability analysis for advanced hull forms. Static stability analysis has been in use by the US Navy for at least 50 years. An alternative analysis technique is proposed which represents a benchmark for future analysis of proposed advanced hulls. It uses modern techniques of dynamical systems to analyse the large amplitude (non-linear) roll re93599 Stealing a march on the ro-ro scene

    Authors

    Jeffrey M Falzarano ; Srinivas Vishnubhotla ; Sarah E Juckett

    Date published

    2005

  • The required collaboration between universities and government administration in plans for the regeneration of ports and harborus that utilise the appeal of marine space

    Authors

    Naoyuki Hirao ; Takeo Kondo ; Kazukiyo Yamamoto et al.

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    Marine space has a variety of appealing elements such as being used for resorts leisure marine sports physical distribution and the function of involving the flow of people. However ports and harbours that have lost their physical distribution functions and are steadily declining are on the increase. The Ministry of Land Infrastructure and Transport is attempting to regenerate such ports and harbours that have lost their vitality. To date regeneration plans for ports and harbours have been under the initiative of government administration. However today plans for the regeneration of ports and harbours and measures for revitalising port towns are being reviewed in various ways including the creative development of communities through participation of the local citizens and the convening of workshops by NPOs. As a part of this the Chiba Port and Harbour Office in which the national government invests has begun a trial attempting to launch new projects to invigorate port towns by forming a program under which plans for the regeneration of ports and harbours and the invigoration of port towns will be undertaken through by collaboration with universities and local administrative governments. As a forerunner to such a model project a program to form a regeneration plan for Kisarazu Port by collaborating with Kisarazu and the Department of Oceanic Architecture & Engineering of Nihon University for senior 4th year students with the national government's Chiba Port and Harbour Office as the moderaX34060

    Authors

    Naoyuki Hirao ; Takeo Kondo ; Kazukiyo Yamamoto et al.

    Date published

    2005

  • The spatial analysis of an extreme wave in a model basin

    Authors

    Bas Buchner ; Arjan Voogt ; Radboud van Dijk

    Date published

    2007

    Abstract

    In the offshore and shipping industry the last few years there has been a lot of attention to extreme wave events. Hurricanes Ivan Katrina and Rita in the Gulf of Mexico confirmed the importance of these extreme waves for all types of offshore structures. At the 'Marco Polo' TLP a maximum wave height of more than 28 m was recorded during hurricane Rita. To assure the integrity and safety of a platform extreme waves should be taken into account in the design. A lot of research has been carried out already on airgap problems of fixed platforms. However for floating structures such as TLPs Semis and Spars the wave loading and response is much more complex. As a pilot study into the understanding of the occurrence of extreme waves the spatial development of an extreme wave (Ac-Hs=1.59) in a model basin was investigated. This wave occurred in a wave spectrum that was not extremely steep and non-linear. It is observed that the extreme wave develops in less than half the wavelength from a relatively normal wave into an extreme crest. The wave crest stays high and constant over a large distance (almost 75m). Linear dispersion is not able to predict the wave propagation towards the observed extreme wave crest. Second order theory improves the prediction of the crest amplitude but not enough. The crest amplitude is still underestimated. This is confirmed by the plots of the probability of extremes. The linear Rayleigh distribution underestimates the crest amplitudes. The second order distribution follows the measurements much better but also in this case typically the highest 10 crests in a 3 hours st101943 Spatial and seasonal variation in reproductive characteristics and spawning of southern calamary (Sepioteuthis australis): spreading the mortality risk

    Authors

    Bas Buchner ; Arjan Voogt ; Radboud van Dijk

    Date published

    2007

  • Feed forward neural networks applied to problems in ocean engineering

    Authors

    David E Hess ; William E Faller ; Robert F Roddy Jr et al.

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    The Neural Network Development Laboratory was established at NSWCCD in 1994 with the directive to apply neural network technology as a predictive tool to problems of interest to the Navy. The Manoeuvering and Control Division of the NSWCCD (Naval Surface Warfare Centre Carderock Div) along with Applied Simulation Technologies have been developing and applying FFNN (feed forward neural networks) to problems of naval interest in Ocean Engineering. A selection of these are discussed. Together they show the power of the non-linear method as well as its utility in diverse applications. Experimental data describing a subset of the B-Screw series of propellers operating in all four quadrants have been reported by MARIN in the Netherlands. The data contain varying pitch to diameter ratios expanded area ratios number of blades and advance angle. These four variables were used to train a FFNN to predict the four-quadrant thrust and torque characteristics for the entire B-screw series over a range of beta from 0 to 360 deg. The results show excellent agreement with the existing data and provide a means for estimating 4-quadrant performance for the entire series. For submarine simulation and design knowledge of the total forces and moments acting on the hull as a function of angle-of-attack sideslip angle and dimensionless turning rate across a large parameter space is required. This data is acquired experimentally and-or numerically and can be used to train a FFNN to act as a Virtual Tow Tank or Virtual CFD Code. The network not only recovers the training data but also serves as a very fast non-line101128 Feed rate characteristics of motor-driven cylinder lubricator with electronic control quill in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine

    Authors

    David E Hess ; William E Faller ; Robert F Roddy Jr et al.

    Date published

    2005

  • Plastic Design of Frames 1 Fundamentals

    Authors

    J. Baker, J. Heyman,

    Shelf Location

    211a

    Abstract

    When this volume was first published, plastic theory was the most modern method of structural analysis, and it made possible the direct design of steel frames in a way not available with only elastic methods. It is now recognized that this theory is also fundamental to structural design in materials such as reinforced concrete and aluminium. This is the first volume of a two-volume work by Professors Baker and Heyman that expounds and illustrates the methods of plastic design. Volume 1 gives the elements of the theory and covers the needs of most undergraduates and designers. A special feature of this work is the large number of exercises (140 in all) with answers. Volume 2 deals with advanced topics of theoretical analysis and practical design. The examples and the methods presented herein are extremely valuable to the engineer. The quality of the writing makes Professors Baker and Heyman's book a pleasure to read. Lord Baker (Sir John Fleetwood Baker, 1901-1985) was Professor of Mechanical Sciences and Head of the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge from 1943 to 1968. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society. Baker's pioneering research led to the development of the plastic theory of design, originally used for steel frames but now recognized as being valid for many structural materials, such as aluminium and reinforced concrete. Additionally, Baker was responsible for many curriculum innovations at the university and was the author of The Steel Skeleton, a two-volume work. Jacques Heyman is the former Head of the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge and the author of ten books, including The Stone Skeleton, Elements of the Theory of Structures, Structural Analysis: A Historical Approach, Elements of Stress Analysis, and the two-volume set Plastic Design of Frames: Volume 1. Fundamentals with Lord Baker and Volume 2. Applications. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, the Institution of Civil Engineers, and the Royal Academy of Engineering. He acted as a consulting engineer for a number of English cathedrals and as a member of the Architectural Advisory Panel for Westminster Abbey and of the Cathedrals Fabric Commission for England, and he has served on many British standards committees. The Stone Skeleton won the Choice Outstanding Academic Books Award in 1996.

    Authors

    J. Baker, J. Heyman,

    Publisher

    Cambridge University Press

    Catalogue number

    620

    Shelf Location

    211a

    Date published

    1980

    ISBN number

    521297788

  • Qualitative and quantitative validation of a numerical code for the realistic simulation of various ship motion scenarios

    Authors

    Janou Hennig ; Heike Billerbeck ; Gunther F Clauss et al.

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    Simulation programs have improved significantly in recent years and are routinely considered in the design process at shipyards and for the basic investigation of ship safety. There is ongoing discussion about safety guidelines given recent developments in ship design. Numerical simulations of ship motions are considered to be a powerful tool in the safety evaluation of a given design. However the subsequent use of numerical codes calls for their thorough validation which has to be carried out both qualitatively and quantitatively. The focus here is on a code used and further developed by the Flensburg Shipyard. In order to validate this code the capsising scenario in steep wave sequences is first realised in the wave tank. The dedicated computer controlled experimental technique ensures the exact phase correlation of wave excitation and resultant ship motions. Thus the registered wave and the track of the ship model in the model test serve as input to the numerical simulation which results in the specific motion time traces. These are now directly compared to the motion registrations from the model tests. First results of the validation by direct comparison of time series have been presented in earlier publications still with the restriction that only a few cases have been investigated. Here the promising method is applied to another scenario in a long-crested sea state including steep wave combinations. Different aspects are discussed which result in the conclusion that the method is feasible for free running ships in stern and sternX33504 A qualitative comparison between some large-scale grounding tests

    Authors

    Janou Hennig ; Heike Billerbeck ; Gunther F Clauss et al.

    Date published

    2005

  • Response reduction of motion and steady wave drifting forces of floating bodies supported by aircushions in regular waves

    Authors

    Tomoki Ikoma ; Koichi Masuda ; Chang-Kyu Rheem et al.

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    The effectiveness of aircushion-supported floating structures in water waves on motion response reduction and characteristics is investigated and results are presented. Although this research was investigating response reduction of very large floating structures by using wave energy absorption devices it was unexpectedly confirmed that the vertical bending moment of an experimental aircushion model which had 100 float units connected using aluminum beams could be reduced. The response characteristics and reduction effect of motion and tether tension of two test models that float in water waves using aircushions are described. The experimental basic model is 3 m long. The basic model has a large mono-aircushion. The second model has three aircushions. The aim of this study is to examine the responses of vertical motion and wave drifting force and to prove that the aircushion supporting system reduces vertical motion and wave drifting force simultaneously. Motion response and tether tension of a linear spring are measured - their linear responses and their steady responses due to wave drifting force are measured and analysed. The result of the model tests has proved that the draft of skirt-like walls greatly influences the air-pressure in the aircushion and the motion response when the mono-aircushion is compartmentalised into three aircushions. It is found that non-linearity of response of the air-pressure is strong. Finally it is confirmed that the reduction of vertical motion and the wave drifting force simultaneously is possible experime100266 Response spectra for explosion resistant design and assessment Steve Walker ; Brian Corr ; Vincent Tam et al.

    Authors

    Tomoki Ikoma ; Koichi Masuda ; Chang-Kyu Rheem et al.

    Date published

    2005

  • Structural integrity assessment of critical components of converted FPSO hulls

    Authors

    Carlos A Bardanachvili ; Alexandre M Pope ; Roberto O Goulart et al.

    Date published

    2004

    Abstract

    A thorough fatigue assessment of two FPSOs was carried out using current class rules. While for the majority of the hull structure the fatigue design approach used produced satisfactory results at the cross tie beam located at frames in the wing tanks the fatigue assessment was considered unreliable. This was evident during the conversion stage because a large number of cracks were found in welded joints of the cross tie beams during the hull conversion inspection. A simplified finite element analysis (FEA) showed that the location where the cracks were found was subjected to high cyclic loads during the operation as an oil tanker and that these loads would be also severe during the FPSO operation. Further FEA was carried out in order to estimate the hot spot stresses at the affected welded joints. The additional fatigue assessment showed that the fatigue design approach used needed to be modified to firstly explain the cracks found in the component secondly to allow for a reliable and conservative estimation of the remaining fatigue life for the cross tie beam after repair work was carried out. The resultant fatigue approach adopted showed that the cross tie beam would not survive the 20 years design requirement of the project unless modifications on the local structural design were undertaken or welded joint fatigue enhancement techniques were applied to the welded joints. To resolve the problem the project decided to adopt a controlled arc welding repair of all cracked joints followed by careful inspection and application of burr machining of weld toes as a fatigue enhancement t97702 Structural integrity assessment of critical components of converted FPSO hulls Carlos A Bardanachvili ; Alexandre M Pope ; Roberto O Goulart et al.

    Authors

    Carlos A Bardanachvili ; Alexandre M Pope ; Roberto O Goulart et al.

    Date published

    2004

  • Development of high-strength cast steel for semi-built-up type crankshaft and stress measurement and evaluation of crankshaft of low-speed diesel engine

    Authors

    Yoji Hanawa ; Shuhei Kajihara ; Yasunori Kagawa et al.

    Date published

    2004

    Abstract

    High-strength cast steel throw Grade 5 is developed for semi-built up type crankshafts of low-speed diesel engines of high power range. The tensile and fatigue strengths of new cast steel are high enough to be used for broad models of engines which has not been covered by the present cast steel. Various material tests had been carried out with the test pieces taken from the actual size crank throw so that the manufacturing approvals could be taken from major classification societies. Various mechanical properties are reported. The application of this cast steel to crankshaft is discussed with these data. Prior to the application of this cast steel to the actual crankshaft the crank pin fillet stresses at several points were measured in workshop in order to verify the safety and to improve the evaluation method of stress. The maximum equivalent stress amplitude occurred in higher position from the crank pin bottom. Then it is shown that the torsional stress is much higher than the bending stress. The dynamic stress of each point is analysed with finite element method to correspond well with the measured data. The measured stresses are compared with the stress at the reference position calculated in accordance with IACS rule UR M53. As the result the rule M53 is shown to overestimate the stress on the safe side for the measured engine and the ratio stresses due to torsion to bending is examined in detail to discuss the evaluation pX39605

    Authors

    Yoji Hanawa ; Shuhei Kajihara ; Yasunori Kagawa et al.

    Date published

    2004