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2089 results Most recent
  • Multiphase boosting - field experience and future developments

    Authors

    P R Darrigan ; R Skorping ; L E Bakken

    Date published

    1995

    Abstract

    The Poseidon Project is a joint venture between Statoil Total and IFP (Institute Petrole du Francais) with the main objective of developing cost effective multiphase boosting and transportation technology. The industrial version (Poseidon 301 a co-axial rotordynamic multiphase pump) was installed on the Gullfaks A platform in 1994 and has accumulated around 5000 running hours. The booster has been found to increase the daily production rate by more than 2000 cu. m. of oil. The SMUBS (Shell multiphase underwater booster station)concept is a joint R&D programme involving SIPM (Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij) Norske Shell and Framo Engineering targeting surface subsea and downhole applications. The main features are: all active components that are susceptible to wear are located in a single retrievable cartridge for simple installation and maintenance; the pump cartridge unit has no orientation requirements; the seals can be set and tested hydraulically; and installation and retrieval is carried out vertically by one tool with one ROV (remotely operated vehicle) for monitoring only. The objective was to boost production from the Rogn South subsea well 10km from the Draugen platform. Shell companies and Statoil are now co-operating in the development of a subsea electrical driven multiphase booster system (ELMSUBS) for applications down to a water depth of 400m. Studies are also underway to evaluate requirements for extending the range of operations to water depths in excess of 1000m.91453 Multiphase drag reduction in horizontal flows

    Authors

    P R Darrigan ; R Skorping ; L E Bakken

    Date published

    1995

  • Residual strength variation of a welded structural component due to a pore

    Authors

    Arnab Ghosh

    Date published

    2008

    Abstract

    In general flaws in welded components in Collins Class submarines are repaired during maintenance periods. However it is not always feasible to carry out such repairs in areas that are considered non-critical or areas that are inaccessible. Therefore it is helpful to analyse for fatigue in welded components in submarines. Welded components subjected to repeated loading are normally analysed using S-N curves to find the end of the fatigue life and Palmgren-Miner's law to determine the damage at any intermediate period of fatigue life. If cracks are evident then fracture mechanics is used to determine the remaining lives of components. A method of analysis is being developed that gives the variation of the residual strength of the component during the fatigue life and therefore allows for more comprehensive analysis of the component at any intermediate period of the fatigue life. In this method the residual strength variation is determined due to a pore in the weld of a structural component in a submarine. Thus as the pore develops with fatigue loading the variation in strength of the component during the entire fatigue life is determined. The proposed method will permit estimation of the maximum allowable stresses with inherent flaws in the welded structure and allow further analysis of such a weld at any intermediate period of its fatigue life.

    Authors

    Arnab Ghosh

    Date published

    2008

  • Ship Design and Construction

    Authors

    A M D'Arcangelo

    Shelf Location

    235c

    Abstract

    The book states its purpose as being 'to assist students and others entering the field of shipbuilding towards a knowledge of how merchant ships are designed and constructed and to provide them with a good background for more advanced study'. Chapter 1 presents ship basic design concepts. Chapter 2 looks at general arrangement aspects of different ship spaces and types of ship. Chapter 3 discusses hull strength and chapter 4 looks at the development of ship structures. Chapter 5 deals with structural components of ships. Chapters 6 and 7 incorporate developments in hull materials and methods of joining structural parts. Changes produced by SOLAS 1960 in hull outfit and fittings, and the introduction of new marine construction materials are included in chapter 8. Chapter 9 looks at cargo handling equipment and heavy lifting gear. Chapter 10 is concerned with anchor, mooring and towing arrangements. Chapter 11 deals with piping arrangements, especially those applicable to large tankers. Chapter 12 looks at environmental control, with ventilation, air conditioning and heating systems. The subject of lifesaving equipment in chapter 13 is related closely to SOLAS 1960 requirements and US Coastguard regulations. Navigation aids are also discussed. Chapter 14 discusses advances in hull preservation and maintenance. Shipyard practice and shipbuilding facilities are covered in chapter 15. Chapters 16 and 17 are concerned with drilling rigs and submersible vehicles

    Authors

    A M D'Arcangelo

    Publisher

    New York ; The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME)

    Shelf Location

    235c

    Date published

    1969

  • Ship inspections - an analogy of contradictions

    Authors

    P Misra

    Date published

    2004

    Abstract

    Ship inspections help gauge the status of a vessel for various applications. There are a variety of inspections with a wide range of expertise. Some inspections are commercially initiated many are iterative and most are regulatory. IMO has taken a very proactive approach to this issue. It is now involved firstly in providing a forum where parties whose members are involved in ship inspections and surveys can present their current practices and offer their individual and collective views on how to deal with the problems caused by the excessive number of inspections to ships when in port or at offshore terminals. Another purpose is to agree that for safety and environmental protection reasons it is desirable to alleviate the workload imposed on shipmasters and officers through a reduction in the number and scope of onboard inspections while in port. A further purpose is to agree on a collective course of action to remedy the situation. Lately a number of standardisation processes and methods have been introduced into the maritime inspection regime. The emphasis is now slowly changing to an audit inspections regime and therefore increasing the reliability of systems components and equipment preventative maintenance and risk-based formal assessment schemes. In the near future it is hoped that digitalisation of such inspection findings will lead to safety indexing as normal practice. The inspection methodologies are discussed briefly and a few contemporary approaches are suggested to obviate contradictions.

    Authors

    P Misra

    Date published

    2004

  • Ships gear

    Authors

    J A Hind

    Publisher

    Fishing News

    Abstract

    Symp held in London July 28 - Aug 2 1966 Papers are Shipowners requirements Probable development in marine navigation 1966 to 1976 Optimum bridge layout Progress in marine radar and its possible relation to automatic control of ships in the future In control of ship borne radar Shipping regulation in port approaches Marine electrical systems Shipboard electrical engineering A.C electric systems in ships Some aspects of a.c. power generation in ships Power meters Unmanned engine rooms? Modern techniques in the control of ship machinery Data logging and automation of main machinery in ships Maintenance of instruments and automatic control efficiency Choice and layout of display instrumentation at the control centre in ships Trends in the design of marine diesel generating plant Noise abatement in ships The use of compressed air at sea Air clutches for marine propulsion Recent developments in marine refrigeration installations Modern trends in marine air conditioning Biological problems in the carriage of deciduous fruit cargoes Automatic control recording and measuring for perishable foodstuffs at sea Remote control techniques applicable to ships deck machinery Mooring of large tankers and bulk carriers The use of higher strength steels in ship construction Systems for the control of ship motions The effect of sea water on the adhesion of surface coatings The future of plastics in ships Developments in container handling Developments in the side loading transporters and deck auxiliaries

    Authors

    J A Hind

    Date published

    1967

    Publisher

    Fishing News

  • Study of high adaptability in 1 to 3 MW class micro pilot gas engine for co-generation field through its development work and field experience

    Authors

    Satoru Goto ; Thoru Hashimoto ; Yoshifumi Nishi

    Date published

    2007

    Abstract

    Advanced gas engines during the past ten years have been taking a lead due to their improved high performance. Performance in areas such as thermal efficiency and BMEP of advanced lean burn gas engines almost matches that of diesel engines. On the other hand the emissions especially NOx concentration in exhaust gas are still at a low level. Nowadays the high-density gas engines where BMEP exceeds 2MPa and the power generation efficiency exceeds 43% are spreading into the market. Problems of knocking misfire and spark plug lifetime now are becoming more and more severe with increased BEMP. Micro pilot has an advantage over conventional spark ignition on stable and fast combustion which is one technical solution for today's problems; especially with its long maintenance intervals. Niigata Power Systems Co Ltd has been delivering the 22AG series micro pilot gas engines to the Japanese market since 2002. The 22AG series can cover 1 to 3MW by 5 types namely 68L and 121618V. The first delivered 8L22AG have been operated continuously every day. There were have been no serious problems until now (May 2006) and total operation time is 32

    Authors

    Satoru Goto ; Thoru Hashimoto ; Yoshifumi Nishi

    Date published

    2007

  • Training marine engineering cadets using diesel engine rig and full mission simulator

    Authors

    Amier Al-Ali

    Date published

    2005

    Abstract

    FMS (full-mission simulators) have been being used fairly extensively in training ships' personnel for several decades. They are widely accepted in the marine industry and have shown themselves to be an excellent tool for training and assessing ships' personnel. A new case study is reported which was carried out on five separate groups of marine engineering cadets with no sea service or simulator experience. A diesel engine rig coupled with a dynamometer at the laboratory was used to improve the engineering skills of the students and to train them to prepare it for operation by doing all the necessary inspections and preparations before during and after the operation of the rig. The study also includes separate training on an FMS for double the time that was spent on the diesel engine rig practical hands-on assessment written and oral examinations on the operation and maintenance of marine diesel engines. In addition an assessment of the different training methods was carried out. The results of the study are compared with those of a previous study. It is concluded that the FMS is a very effective training tool and that the trainees using the FMS performed rather better than when using the full-scope simulator with the diesel engine rig.

    Authors

    Amier Al-Ali

    Date published

    2005

  • Understanding the impact of surface waves on microwave water level measurements

    Authors

    Robert M Heitsenrether ; Mark H Bushnell ; John D Boon

    Shelf Location

    214b

    Abstract

    Over the past 200 years water level observations have been collected and used to help all those involved with ocean activities. An important mission of NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration) CO-OPS (Centre for Operational Oceanographic Products) is to support those who depend upon these data by providing the most up-to-date water level products and services available. As technology evolves and improved methods for collecting water level are developed CO-OPS facilitates the transition of new technology to an operational status selecting newly developed sensors or systems from the R&D community and bringing them to a monitoring setting. This process starts with CO-OPS carrying out a series of rigorous tests and evaluation of a newly developed microwave sensor. Microwave altimeter technology has been recently developed and offers the opportunity to overcome one of the largest disadvantages of currently used water level sensors by avoiding contact with the harsh marine environment and the resulting physical damage. An out-of-the-water sensor setup will also result in significantly lower installation costs and potentially less maintenance requirements as compared with existing sub-surface sensors. NOAA and CO-OPS have carried out a series of tests of several different types of MWWL (microwave water level) sensors in order to gain an understanding of sensor functions and performance capabilities and to assess the suitability for incorporation into the NOAA NWLON (National Water Level Observatory Network). A detailed overview of the setup97615 Understanding the measured VIV data of a steel catenary riser installed at P-18 platform in Campos Basin

    Authors

    Robert M Heitsenrether ; Mark H Bushnell ; John D Boon

    Date published

    2008

    Shelf Location

    214b

  • Modern marine engineer's manual Volume 2 3rd edition

    Authors

    Everett C Hunt ed. in chief ; James A Harbach assoc. ed. ; Alan L Rowen assoc. ed.

    Shelf Location

    234b

    Abstract

    This third edition is an updated text of the second edition, designed to provide information concerning new and changing technologies that have developed during the past ten years. The chapters covering refrigeration and HVAC have been revised to incorporate new refrigerants replacing the fluorocarbons phased out by the Clean Air Act. Other international protocols governing operation and maintenance of refrigeration systems are discussed. The propulsion systems compatible with the unique cargo of LNG vessels are described in Chapter 20. Chapter 21, covering hull machinery, has been completely rewritten to describe machinery in current use. The computer-based integrated and centralised control system of alarms, condition monitoring, management, record keeping and communications found on modern passenger vessels and other specialised vessels are described in Chapter 24. Technical advances in monitoring and analysis of machinery and hull vibrations have been added to Chapter 25. New equipment and systems for handling trash, sewage, bilge water, and other waste materials have been added to Chapter 28. Chapter 30 has been rewritten to provide current and more detailed information on ship trial procedures. Where materials from the second edition has been used it has been carefully reviewed to assure it is correct for current usage. There are chapters on marine diesel engines, engine descriptions, marine refrigeration systems, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, cryogenic cargo systems, hull machinery, marine electrical systems, electrical machinery, shipboard central operations systems, shipboard vibration analysis, inert gas systems and crude oil washing machinery, coal burning technology, waste disposal systems, propellers and propulsion and machinery tests and trials.

    Authors

    Everett C Hunt ed. in chief ; James A Harbach assoc. ed. ; Alan L Rowen assoc. ed.

    Publisher

    Centreville, Md. : Cornell Maritime Press, 1999-2002.

    Catalogue number

    623.87

    Shelf Location

    234b

    Date published

    2002

    ISBN number

    870335375